The Clone Wars Rewatch: Boba Fett Sets a “Death Trap”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

42: “Death Trap” (Season Two, Episode 20)

“Who my father was matters less than my memory of him.”

A scene from "Death Trap."

Synopsis:

Determined to kill Jedi Master Mace Windu, young Boba Fett poses as a clone cadet and sneaks aboard a Jedi cruiser to plant a bomb in Windu’s quarters, but the plan goes awry.

Analysis:

You almost feel bad for Boba Fett here. A clone but not a clone trooper, son of Jango Fett but not really a son in the traditional sense.

A scene from "Death Trap." A scene from "Death Trap."

Orphaned and alone, he’s being raised up by the ruthless bounty hunter Aurra Sing to be little more than a killer without a conscience.

A scene from "Death Trap."

Posing as a common cadet to get his revenge on Mace Windu, the Jedi who murdered his father on Geonosis, as Lucky, he blends right in aboard the Jedi cruiser with the exception of his exceptional shooting skills.

A scene from "Death Trap."

A scene from "Death Trap."

Lucky looks harmless enough to invite pity from the clone troopers who lead him directly to Windu’s quarters and effectively (although inadvertently) help to lay the trap that kills one of their own.

A scene from "Death Trap."

But his anger leads to hate, and his hate leads to suffering — for Windu, for the soldiers aboard the Endurance, for the cadets who he and Aurra Sing left for dead, and for himself.

Traitor.

Intel:

  • When the Endurance suffers a hull breach, one of the troopers caught in the blast lets out a “Wilhelm scream,” a sound effect that dates back to the 1930s and has been used in every Star Wars film.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when R2-D2 saves the day in “R2 Come Home.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Boba Fett Sets a “Death Trap”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Framing the “Duchess of Mandalore”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

41: “Duchess of Mandalore” (Season Two, Episode 14)

“In war, truth is the first casualty.”

A scene from "Duchess of Mandalore."

Synopsis:

On Coruscant, word reaches Duchess Satine that Death Watch is mobilizing, sparking a Republic invasion. On the run from Republic authorities, Satine turns to her old friend Obi-Wan Kenobi for help.

A scene from "Duchess of Mandalore."

Analysis:

In a war embroiling the galaxy, Duchess Satine just wants her planet to be left alone. But those who would seek a tactical advantage by involving Mandalore in the conflict are not so content to allow it.

Seemingly betrayed by her allies, overruled by the Galactic Senate supplying a Republic occupation and an intervention that threatens her stance as a neutral system, Satine is the victim of a corrupt government.

A scene from "Duchess of Mandalore." A scene from "Duchess of Mandalore."

“Counting on the Republic is a mistake,” she says. From her place outside of the growing turmoil, she can see the first suggestion of the changes to come more clearly than those inside the conflict.

A scene from "Duchess of Mandalore."

Her character called into question, and finding herself framed for a crime she did not commit, Satine quickly goes from well heeled bureaucrat to fugitive on the run from the law.

A scene from "Duchess of Mandalore."

But her integrity wins out. She still has friends willing to help put the inciting message into clearer and appropriate context. And she has Obi-Wan, her dear friend (and nothing more), who comes to her aid in her darkest hour.

For the third time in this story arc, Satine and Obi-Wan find themselves back-to-back, united against an impending doom.

Although Satine successfully clears her name in the end with some help from Padmé Amidala and others, the threats are far from over. Death Watch remains and the war continues to rage around her neutral homeworld.

A scene from "Duchess of Mandalore."

Intel:

  • The Coruscant plaza in this episode was inspired by a Ralph McQuarrie concept painting.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Clone Wars Rewatch will be taking a break for Star Wars Celebration Chicago next week! Come back Thursday, April 18, when a young Boba Fett sets out to avenge his father in “Death Trap.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Framing the “Duchess of Mandalore”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: A Hidden Traitor on the “Voyage of Temptation”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

40: “Voyage of Temptation” (Season Two, Episode 13)

“Fear not for the future, weep not for the past.”

A scene from "Voyage of Temptation."

Synopsis:

Duchess Satine travels from Mandalore to Coruscant on a diplomatic mission, with Obi-Wan Kenobi, Anakin Skywalker, and a team of troopers to defend her from several assassination attempts. And aboard the luxury starship, Anakin discovers that Obi-Wan and the Duchess have a history together.

A scene from "Voyage of Temptation."

Analysis:

Obi-Wan Kenobi is so poised and reserved most of the time, the even-keeled master to Anakin Skywalker’s impatient Padawan, but here we get a glimpse at their similar hearts, and a deeper understanding of Kenobi’s struggles during his time learning from Qui-Gon Jinn.

A scene from "Voyage of Temptation."

As it turns out, Obi-Wan and Anakin have both grappled with the Jedi’s doctrine to avoid attachments. Although it’s unclear how much truth is in the confession “Obi” and Satine make to each other just before turning the tables on the traitorous Senator Tal Merrik, there’s certainly something in their history that’s been left unresolved and seems quite intimate. “Had you said the word, I would have left the Jedi Order,” he tells her. All the most believable lies include shades of the truth.

A scene from "Voyage of Temptation." A scene from "Voyage of Temptation."

You can see the way it weighs on Obi-Wan, perhaps as dormant feelings bubble back to the surface as he’s reunited with Satine. You can see it when the two fight, back to back once more, an unstoppable team united against the impending threat.

A scene from "Voyage of Temptation."

And this dichotomy, of master and apprentice as well as surface duties versus hidden emotions, is reflected in the goings on aboard the Coronet.

A scene from "Voyage of Temptation." A scene from "Voyage of Temptation."

For even as Satine enjoys some fine dining with her diplomatic cohorts, there is trouble brewing on the levels below.

Intel:

  • The roles are reversed in the turbolift as Anakin talks to Obi-Wan about his anxiety in seeing Satine. The pair had a similar conversation in Attack of the Clones just before Anakin was reunited with Padmé.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when Obi-Wan and Satine are on the run in “Duchess of Mandalore.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

The Clone Wars Rewatch: A Hidden Traitor on the “Voyage of Temptation”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: “The Mandalore Plot”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

39: “The Mandalore Plot” (Season Two, Episode 12)

“If you ignore the past, you jeopardize your future.”

Synopsis:

Alarming rumors about the peace-abiding Duchess Satine of Mandalore prompt Obi-Wan to investigate the secluded planet. Satine wants to keep Mandalore neutral in the Clone Wars, but the actions of a violent splinter group — Death Watch — threaten to push the planet towards war.

Analysis:

A Jedi is forbidden from becoming too attached, but there’s clearly some kind of history between Duchess Satine and Obi-Wan Kenobi. The exact nature of it remains unclear, but their relationship now is strained by competing ideals and beliefs.

Satine is insistent on keeping Mandalore out of the conflict and remaining neutral. As a sworn keeper of the peace, shouldn’t Obi-Wan understand this commitment to impartiality to keep her people safe from the ravages of war?

But Obi-Wan knows that the time to be indifferent and stay out of the battle has passed the Republic by. He doesn’t have to agree with the war or the politics of the bloody confrontation to understand its necessity. Refusing to fight would essentially invite a Separatist victory.

On Mandalore, we see a microcosm of this greater conflict. The Duchess hopes to maintain the peace, but Death Watch, a small sect of extremists on the moon of Concordia, wants to return Mandalore to the ways of their warrior ancestors. To make their point, the renegades release an explosive device at a memorial shrine and show they are willing to die rather than undergo questioning. There can be no reasoning with that mindset.

Meanwhile, there’s a rumor that Satine is leading her people into an alliance with the Separatists, when the truth is that the Separatists are backing Death Watch and their secret leader Pre Vizsla, armed with the legendary darksaber.

Over the course of the mission, Satine and Obi-Wan challenge each other and prove to be stronger working together. Satine saves the Jedi’s life when his recon mission goes awry, and he returns the favor in kind, leaping to safety with Satine when an explosive device whizzes above their heads.

Their banter also shows a more vulnerable side to Obi-Wan, one he works hard to keep hidden. When Satine admonishes him to be patient, we see that the young Jedi Knight is still struggling with the ways of the order. Ironically, she uses the same directive Obi-Wan will utter so far in the future to young Luke Skywalker.

Intel:

  • The cubist-style painting in Pre Vizsla‘s meeting room is an homage to “Guernica” by Pablo Picasso.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when Duchess Satine heads to Coruscant on a diplomatic mission in “The Voyage of Temptation.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

The Clone Wars Rewatch: “The Mandalore Plot”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: A Padawan’s Pride and a “Lightsaber Lost”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

38: “Lightsaber Lost” (Season Two, Episode 11)

“Easy isn’t always simple.”

Synopsis:

On assignment in the Coruscant underworld, a pickpocket steals Ahsoka’s lightsaber and she must enlist the help of an ancient Jedi, Tera Sinube, to get it back.

A scene from "Lightsaber Lost."

Analysis:

As Tera Sinube says, “The value of moving slowly is that one can always clearly see the way ahead.”

In her excitement and drive to become a  formidable Jedi Knight, Ahsoka is always moving at a breakneck pace. She’s strong-willed and stubborn, much like her teacher, but in losing her lightsaber she gets a jolt to her system about the value of patience, something Anakin Skywalker is also still trying to master.

A scene from "Lightsaber Lost."

Who among us doesn’t struggle with slowing down and anxiety about trying to keep up? Tera Sinube, probably.

If we’re being honest, the ancient Jedi Master, not unlike Yoda in his calm, measured movements, at first seems old and slow. Ahsoka probably fears that bringing him along will put the brakes on her mission. But he’s an essential teacher at a time when she is lost, frightened, and desperate to reclaim her weapon (and her pride).

As Anakin is always reminding her, like his master reminded him, “Your lightsaber is your life.” Losing it leaves Ahsoka largely defenseless, although she still has the Force as her ally, and her wits about her. But there’s more to it than that.

A scene from "Lightsaber Lost."

Like the arms dealer they were tracking when they first arrived in the seedy underworld of Coruscant, Ahsoka feels responsible for whatever damage her lightsaber does even when it’s not in the palm of her hand. That guilt drives her mission, but it also stokes her anxiety while the ancient weapon remains just out of her grasp.

Is Ahsoka to blame for the havoc created by her lightsaber in the hands of another? Yes and no.

A scene from "Lightsaber Lost."
A scene from "Lightsaber Lost."

She’s not responsible for the actions of others, and she bears no burden for the choices they make. And it’s not her fault that the pickpocket snagged her weapon. She is the victim of that particular crime and she should not be blamed.

But perhaps by alerting her master to the problem immediately, they could have avoided some of the damage wrought and reclaimed the weapon much faster, long before the Twi’lek woman and her child were thrust into harm’s way.

A scene from "Lightsaber Lost."

Intel:

  • While Jocasta Nu is trying to help Ahsoka find her thief in the archives, they come across the familiar face of Brea Tonnika, one of the Tonnika sisters glimpsed in the cantina at Mos Eisley in A New Hope.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when Obi-Wan Kenobi heads to Mandalore to investigate some alarming rumors in “The Mandalore Plot.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

The Clone Wars Rewatch: A Padawan’s Pride and a “Lightsaber Lost”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Captain Rex and “The Deserter”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

37: “The Deserter” (Season Two, Episode 10)

“It is the quest for honor that makes one honorable.”

A scene from "The Deserter."

Synopsis:

When General Grievous is shot down over Saleucami, Obi-Wan leads an expedition into the wilderness to find the droid general. Captain Rex is injured during the search, leading to the accidental discovery of Cut Lawquane, a clone deserter.

Analysis:

Born and bred for battle, neither the Kaminoans nor the Republic intended for the clones to have autonomy and the freedom to choose. But in the aftermath of the Battle of Geonosis, Cut Lawquane chose to run. “I was just another expendable clone, waiting for my turn to be slaughtered in a war that made no sense to me,” he says.

Disillusioned with the futility of war, living a life that felt devoid of all meaning, and watching his brothers being senselessly killed, Cut chose to be free.

A scene from "The Deserter."

In discovering the deserter, Captain Rex must confront aspects of his own personality, thoughts he’s tried to ignore. As Cut puts it, “I’m as close to you as any lifeform can be.” If he could, would Rex choose a different life? Is it a thought that crosses every clone’s mind at some point?

A scene from "The Deserter."

The clones swear an oath to the Republic, but even that pledge is something that’s ingrained at such an early age it can’t really be called a choice. They have a duty to uphold as soldiers in arms, but again, it’s not something they sign up for so much as it’s something they’re born into.

Among the ranks, there are hints of unrest. Clones seek out nicknames, face tattoos, unique hair, anything to distinguish themselves from the other faces that look exactly like their own. They’re not content to be part of a mindless, identical hive of fighters.

A scene from "The Deserter." A scene from "The Deserter."

Most of them soldier on. They stop short of asking too many questions about what it means to be individuals, whether or not they deserve the right to choose their own path, to decide against killing and demonstrate compassion instead, or fight for something they love.

A scene from "The Deserter."

Rex routinely demonstrates an unimpeachable allegiance to the Republic, and there’s no question of his loyalty. But looking at Cut, his life, his family, Rex must confront his options both as an individual and a soldier. He has to at least consider Cut’s decisions, an alternate path that shows what his life could be. And he has to consider his sworn duty. If he followed strict orders, he would turn Cut in for the deserter he admits to being.

A scene from "The Deserter."
A scene from "The Deserter."

In this case, Rex exercises his own freedom to choose. Healed and rested, he goes back to the frontlines, but Cut and his secret are safe from prying eyes. In the end, Rex’s allegiance is ultimately to what he feels is right.

A scene from "The Deserter."

Intel:

  • Supervising Director Dave Filoni and the animation team took great care to make sure their dejarik table looked and moved just like the stop-motion version created for A New Hope.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when a pickpocket steals Ahsoka’s ancient weapon in “Lightsaber Lost.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

https://www.starwars.com/news/the-clone-wars-rewatch-the-deserter

The Clone Wars Rewatch: “Grievous Intrigue” High Above Saleucami

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

36: “Grievous Intrigue” (Season Two, Episode 9)

“For everything you gain, you lose something else.”

A scene from "Grievous Intrigue."

Synopsis:

Jedi Master Eeth Koth is taken hostage and tortured by General Grievous. Although Anakin Skywalker, Obi-Wan Kenobi and Adi Gallia devise a daring rescue plan, they soon realize the General has a plan of his own. Soon, the Jedi Knights and the Separatist general must try to outmaneuver each other in a ship-to-ship and hand-to-hand battle high over the planet Saleucami.

A scene from "Grievous Intrigue."

Analysis:

Amid the epic lightsaber duels and harrowing rescues, there’s a moment where everything slows down and it’s just two foes talking things through.

A scene from "Grievous Intrigue."

There’s no love lost between Obi-Wan Kenobi and General Grievous, and this is far from their last tangle. But Kenobi’s assessment that Grievous is little more than Count Dooku’s “errand boy” seems to wound what’s left of the cyborg’s ego.

More machine now than, well, whatever he was to begin with, Grievous often seems devoid of emotion. He’s cold and calculating, as comfortable clawing his way across a command deck on two mechanical legs as he is scurrying like a spider through the hallways. The last remaining vestiges of his organic form seem to be capable of exhibiting only the most primal survival instincts — fight and flight.

A scene from "Grievous Intrigue."

He commands a massive droid army, but as Kenobi points out, is that much of an accomplishment? “An army with no loyalty, no spirit, just programming. What have you to show for all your power? What have you to gain?”

It’s almost enough to make you feel sorry for the monster Grievous has become. Almost.

A scene from "Grievous Intrigue."

Intel:

  • Commander Wolffe looks a bit different than the last time we saw him. At some point, he suffered an eye injury and was given a cybernetic replacement.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when the hunt for Grievous continues on the surface of Saleucami in “The Deserter.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

The Clone Wars Rewatch: “Grievous Intrigue” High Above Saleucami

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Beware the “Brain Invaders”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

35: “Brain Invaders” (Season Two, Episode 8)

“Attachment is not compassion.”

A scene from "Brain Invaders."

Synopsis:

While the Jedi Knights transport Poggle the Lesser as a prisoner to Coruscant, Padawans Barriss Offee and Ahsoka Tano are dispatched to escort a medical frigate to its destination. But when Geonosian brain worms take control of the clone troopers aboard their supply ship, Ahsoka and Barriss must stop the vessel from unleashing the deadly plague upon the galaxy.

A scene from "Brain Invaders."

A scene from "Brain Invaders."
A scene from "Brain Invaders."

Analysis:

Clones betraying and trying to murder the Jedi. A Jedi turning against one of their own. These are the shadows of things to come, in the future of the galaxy and when parasitic brain worms invade a supply ship.

A scene from "Brain Invaders." A scene from "Brain Invaders."

With her master far away and Barriss as well as many of the clones plagued by the infection, Ahsoka is largely left to her own devices. In a battle with her beleaguered friend, she must make the most difficult decision of all: fulfill Barriss’s plea to put her out of her misery by ending her life, or trust that the actions she’s taken to contain and kill the brain worms will be successful.

If Ahsoka is wrong, it means endangering the galaxy, unleashing the deadly plague currently contained aboard the small ship. But Ahsoka, plainly, couldn’t bring herself to kill her friend.

A scene from "Brain Invaders."

In the medical bay, recovering from the traumatic ordeal, Ahsoka is plagued by doubt over her choices. But in a touching moment of compassion and kindness, Anakin allays those fears, consoling his Padawan by assuring her that she trusted her instincts and did what she thought was best.

A scene from "Brain Invaders."

When any big decision presents itself in life, it’s tempting to think there’s only one right choice. We can be paralyzed by fear and doubt about making the wrong decision. But as Anakin demonstrates, and as Star Wars teaches us again and again, trusting in your instincts will lead you to a solid course of action.

And most of the time, there’s no real wrong choice. Right and wrong, after all, are subject to your point of view.

Intel:

  • Look closely at the Padawans’ pillows. The pillow cases are printed with the Republic cog logo, which is also emblazoned on the clones’ undersuits.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when Jedi Master Eeth Koth is taken hostage and tortured by General Grievous in “Grievous Intrigue.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Beware the “Brain Invaders”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: A “Legacy of Terror” in the Tunnels of Geonosis

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

34: “Legacy of Terror” (Season Two, Episode 7)

“Sometimes, accepting help is harder than offering it.”

A scene from "Legacy of Terror."

Synopsis:

Jedi Master Luminara Unduli disappears while tracking Poggle the Lesser, leading Obi-Wan, Anakin, and a platoon of clone troopers deep into the hive of Karina the Great.

A scene from "Legacy of Terror."

Analysis:

An army of undead warriors is somehow the least creepy thing about this episode, which ventures into the stuff of nightmares quite skillfully.

A scene from "Legacy of Terror." A scene from "Legacy of Terror."

Between the gray-skinned zombie Geonosians, the reveal of the bloated and egg-birthing queen, and the brain worms, the underground throne room of Queen Karina the Great is a horror show for all who enter.

There’s a sense of claustrophobia from the beginning of the story as Luminara enters the blinding sandstorm, which continues on the journey deep into the catacombs.

A scene from "Legacy of Terror." A scene from "Legacy of Terror."

Few things in the galaxy can best a Jedi’s lightsaber, but neither the ancient weapon nor a blaster bolt to the head can kill the lurching, dead-eyed soldiers, mere husks controlled by the secret queen thanks to the brain worms that create a hivemind connectivity.

The Jedi’s only hope is distraction and suffocation, taking out supports to collapse the walls and ceiling that create the queen’s chamber in an effort to buy them time to escape with their captive, Poggle the Lesser. Ultimately, their only hope isn’t to kill the bugs, but rather just to slow them down, and important reminder that even Jedi sometimes come up against a foe they cannot beat.

Intel:

  • Anakin’s reaction to the discovery of the zombies is almost an echo of Luke’s response to Darth Vader in The Empire Strikes Back: “That can’t be true. That’s impossible!”

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

A scene from "Legacy of Terror."

Next up: We haven’t seen the last of the brain worms after all. Come back next Thursday for “Brain Invaders.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

The Clone Wars Rewatch: A “Legacy of Terror” in the Tunnels of Geonosis

The Clone Wars Rewatch: A Matter of Trust Inside the “Weapons Factory”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

33: “Weapons Factory” (Season Two, Episode 6)

“No gift is more precious than trust.”

A scene from "Weapons Factory."

Synopsis:

Anakin, Ahsoka, Luminara Unduli, and her Padawan, Barriss Offee, lead a mission to destroy a droid factory on Geonosis. While the masters act as decoys diverting a group of super tanks, Ahsoka and Barriss infiltrate the plant via a labyrinth of catacombs beneath the city.

A scene from "Weapons Factory." A scene from "Weapons Factory."

Analysis:

Together, Ahsoka and Barriss are ready to make the ultimate sacrifice for the greater good, destroying the plant while almost certainly dooming themselves to death by suffocation, buried far below the surface.

But, hand in hand, they never lose hope. Ahsoka has faith that her master will not leave them for dead, and she’s right to believe in Anakin and his legendary levels of attachment and bullheaded perseverance despite dismal odds.

A scene from "Weapons Factory."

A scene from "Weapons Factory."

The two young Padawans are perfect foils for each other: Ahsoka, prone to recklessness yet also adept at pivoting when a plan fails and devising a new, unconventional solution, has learned much from her master, while Barriss is more measured like her calm and even-keeled mentor, a studious learner who is thorough in planning and preparedness.

As a team, these qualities allow Ahsoka and Barriss to overcome the odds and not only fulfill their mission to destroy the factory from the inside out but continue working together even after they’re buried alive.

If this is your first time watching the series, you’re in for a shocking and fascinating arc for the friendship forming here between Ahsoka and Barriss.

A scene from "Weapons Factory." A scene from "Weapons Factory."

But knowing where Barriss is headed makes some aspects of this episode stand out more sharply, sometimes subtly in the dialogue, like when dependable Barriss utters two simple words as they venture into the catacombs, where sleeping enemies lie: “Trust me.”

Intel:

  • It’s hard to make out, but the nose art on Luminara’s gunship shows a clone trooper giving County Dooku the boot.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when the undead come to the defense of Geonosis in “Legacy of Terror.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

The Clone Wars Rewatch: A Matter of Trust Inside the “Weapons Factory”