The Clone Wars Rewatch: A Blueprint for “Evil Plans”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

50: “Evil Plans” (Season Three, Episode 8)

“A failure in planning is a plan for failure.”

A scene from "Evil Plans."

Synopsis: 

On Coruscant, C-3PO is abducted by the bounty hunter Cad Bane, who is working for Jabba the Hutt and searching for information about the Senate building. Finding C-3PO devoid of useful information, Bane and his accomplices kidnap R2-D2 and extract the vital data, before memory-wiping the droids and sending them on their way.

A scene from "Evil Plans."

Analysis:

It would seem that C-3PO has been made to suffer. It’s just his lot in life.

A scene from "Evil Plans."
A scene from "Evil Plans."

Artoo and Threepio may bicker like an old married couple, but this mismatched pair of counterparts clearly have real affection for each other.

Artoo seems to feel some sympathy in his circuits when he overhears the kidnappers plans to dismantle his golden friend, and he gives himself up to save C-3PO.

It’s the kind of selfless act of bravery we’ve come to expect from the hearty astromech, surrendering himself at great personal cost to save his friend. Unfortunately it’s an act that has greater consequences, which will endanger the safety of the Senate building and the politicians inside.

A scene from "Evil Plans." A scene from "Evil Plans."

In the end, neither one of them have any memory of the altercation after an effective bit of memory wiping. All that’s left is a seemingly innocuous task — a trip to the market to buy some jogan fruit — that has incredibly important political implications to ensure Padmé’s dinner party with the Roonans is a success.

A scene from "Evil Plans."

It’s a clever bit of storytelling to highlight how sometimes something that seems unimportant — the purchase of some fruit, a map saved in a memory bank — can have wide-reaching ramifications.

Intel:

  • A remark that C-3PO previously worked for the chief negotiator in the Manakron system supports George Lucas’s original notes that the golden droid was over 100 years old in A New Hope. That means Anakin did not build the droid from scratch, but rebuilt an older droid that had previous protocol assignments.
  • J0-N0, the torture droid, is based on 8D8, the smelting droid spotted in Jabba’s palace in Return of the Jedi.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when bounty hunters seize control of the Senate building in “Hostage Crisis.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

Site tags: #StarWarsBlog

The Clone Wars Rewatch: A Blueprint for “Evil Plans”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Lost Hope in the “Sphere of Influence”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

49: “Sphere of Influence” (Season Three, Episode 4)

“A child stolen is a lost hope.”

A scene from "Sphere of Influence."

Synopsis:

Chairman Papanoida‘s daughters, Chi Eekway and Che Amanwe, are kidnapped and held for ransom and it’s up to Ahsoka Tano and the Senator from Pantora, Riyo Chuchi, to aid the new chairman and his son in recovering their family members.

A scene from "Sphere of Influence."

Analysis:

Riyo Chuchi really came into her own on Orto Plutonia, and she and Chairman Papanoida both emerge from this episode as fierce and formidable defenders of Pantora and its people.

A scene from "Sphere of Influence."

Like Padmé Amidala, Chuchi is young and idealistic, but also fearless and tireless when it comes to standing up for what is right. She bravely joins Ahsoka on a harrowing quest to go deep into enemy territory to free one of the kidnapped daughters instead of assigning this dangerous mission to another.

A scene from "Sphere of Influence."

And under questioning she dares to stand up to the Trade Federation, shrewdly brokering a deal that helps to end the suffering of her people isolated by the blockade.

A scene from "Sphere of Influence." A scene from "Sphere of Influence."

Baron Papanoida, for his part, isn’t exactly a timid bureaucrat content to let others do his dirty work. Instead of waiting for the authorities, who move too slow for the dedicated father’s liking, he takes matters into his own hands with the help of his son, Ion, without a second thought for his own safety.

A scene from "Sphere of Influence."A scene from "Sphere of Influence."

He studies the crime scene and finds the blood evidence, enters the wretched hive of Jabba’s Palace armed with the proof of Greedo’s interference, and expertly flips a table during a good old fashioned cantina shoot out. And it’s clear he’s raised all of his children to be just as bold when Che Amanwe grabs a blaster and joins the fight despite still being locked in binders.

A scene from "Sphere of Influence."

The chairman’s charisma even moves Jabba to listen to the father’s plight. After all, a father himself to little Rotta, it wasn’t long ago that Jabba was seeking help to have his precious child returned to him amid a Huttnapping plot.

Intel:

  • George Lucas originated the role of Chairman Papanoida in a cameo appearance in Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith. Here, the animated version is voiced by actor Corey Burton, who based his performance on the voice of another famous director, Orson Welles.
  • The episode was written by Katie Lucas, who appeared on film alongside her father and originated the role of Chi Eekway.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when a simple errand leads to a droid kidnapping in “Evil Plans.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

Site tags: #StarWarsBlog

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Lost Hope in the “Sphere of Influence”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: 99 and the “ARC Troopers”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

48: “ARC Troopers” (Season Three, Episode 2)

“Fighting a war tests a soldier’s skill, defending his home test a soldier’s heart.”

A scene from "ARC Troopers."

Synopsis: 

The Republic learns of an impending Separatist attack on Kamino, and Anakin and Obi-Wan hurry to the planet to help Rex, Cody, Fives and Echo lead the clones in a desperate defense of their home planet against Asajj Ventress, General Grievous and an army of droids.

A scene from "ARC Troopers."

Analysis:

Just as General Grievous and Asajj Ventress are eager to prove that they are of equal worth in battle for the Separatists, so too is Clone 99 anxious to demonstrate his worth to the Republic when the war comes to Kamino.

A scene from "ARC Troopers."

By targeting the place where the clones were born on a mission to steal their very essence, clone DNA, the Separatists have made this battle far more personal than the rest of the war. And for 99, deemed unfit for regular combat due to genetic defects and other physical abnormalities in the cloning process, it’s a chance to prove he’s just as useful as the rest of them.

A scene from "ARC Troopers." A scene from "ARC Troopers."

He’s ready to fight alongside his brothers just as the cloners intended, even though some of the clones are still prone to agree that he shouldn’t be part of the fight.

They want to protect him, but in doing so they fail to see what Hevy always could — that 99 is really no different than the rest of them. He’s got it where it counts.

A scene from "ARC Troopers."

Clone 99 delivers ammunition and he knows his way around the facility better than anyone. He’s an asset to the cause even if he isn’t on the front lines blasting clankers.

As much as his brothers feel a personal connection to their home world, he’s the clone who’s been left behind truly at home on Kamino and he wants to be as helpful as he can in defending it.

A scene from "ARC Troopers." A scene from "ARC Troopers."

As Fives reminds the cadets, whether their training is incomplete, they’re full-fledged veterans, or in 99’s case caught somewhere in between, they are all equals. “Same heart. Same blood.”

And even though this battle ends with 99’s death, there’s a poetic justice in him finally fulfilling his destiny and dying in combat. “I’m a soldier, like you,” he says just before he’s wounded. That he is. A soldier just as brave and noble and just as vital to the cause as any clone.

A scene from "ARC Troopers."

Intel:

  • Designers at Zen Studios were so inspired by “Clone Cadets” and “ARC Troopers,” they added a secret space to the back of a Star Wars: The Clone Wars pinball table to pay homage to the episodes, with graphics of dreary Kamino and two mini-playfields. “The visuals, the story and the epic attack on Kamino were so exciting, we immediately added the action of these episodes to our list of what we wanted to see in the table,” says designer Ivan Nicoara. “We already knew that the basic atmosphere of the table would come from very vivid and vibrant colors, so a gloomy and rainy Kamino served as a great contrast.”
  • This episode is a sequel to “Rookies.”

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when Chairman Papanoida‘s daughters are kidnapped in “Sphere of Influence.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

Site tags: #StarWarsBlog

The Clone Wars Rewatch: 99 and the “ARC Troopers”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: “Assassin”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

47: “Assassin” (Season Three, Episode 7)

“The future has many paths — choose wisely.”

A scene from "Assassin."

Synopsis:

Aurra Sing, the ruthless Palliduvan bounty hunter presumed dead, returns in premonitions plaguing Padawan Ahsoka Tano. Now Ahsoka must protect Senator Padmé Amidala during a political mission to Alderaan and try to stop the assassination attempt in her visions — if they can be trusted.

Analysis:

Voices and visions torment Ahsoka Tano through the Force as surely as our own overactive imaginations can trouble us with worry and doubt about what’s to come.

A scene from "Assassin."

Over a friendly game of dejarik, Ahsoka and Padmé are far more than Padawan protector and endangered senator — they’re two women with a genuinely warm friendship relating to each other about being scared, insecure, and unsure of themselves.

Ahsoka does not yet trust her instincts, and without a master to guide her on this solo mission she feels untethered. She lacks confidence in herself and it leaves her doubting her premonitions and her choices on the matter.

A scene from "Assassin."

Padmé doesn’t just sympathize with Ahsoka’s problem — she shows the young Jedi empathy and compassion. As a teenaged queen of Naboo, planet-changing decisions were ultimately up to her alone. She knows how Ahsoka feels, and how important it is for her to learn to be confident in her decisions.

A scene from "Assassin."

As a senator frequently imperiled by attempts on her life, Padmé shows immense resolve. She refuses to be paralyzed by fear and leads by example, living her life despite the dangers and facing it head on when it finds her.

A scene from "Assassin."

And when even all the precautions and premonitions can’t stop Padmé from getting injured and Ahsoka blames herself, Padmé imparts another important lesson on her young friend. Ahsoka did everything in her power to help stop the assassin. But if someone wants Padmé dead, they will follow her wherever she goes. They will find a way.

A scene from "Assassin."

Padmé is courageous and unflinching. She understands the dangers of the life she has chosen and she is unwavering in her choice. And when Ahsoka gets hurt trying to stop a second attack, Padmé calmly levels her own blaster and finishes the job, stunning Aurra Sing until help can arrive.

Not only does Padmé follow her own advisement every step of the way, but perhaps most importantly, Padmé supports Ahsoka by trusting the young Padawan’s instincts. And through that support, Ahsoka may learn to trust them herself. Failure may be an excellent teacher, but so is a tough senator from Naboo who leads with compassion, an empathetic ear, and a fierce determination to help those in need.

Intel:

  • Listen closely and you’ll hear notes from Leia’s theme as Padmé’s ship touches down on Alderaan.
  • Designers went back to original Ralph McQuarrie concept art and illustrations created in the making of Revenge of the Sith to design the familiar planet.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when the clones must defend their home in “ARC Troopers.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

Site tags: #StarWarsBlog

The Clone Wars Rewatch: “Assassin”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Rebels in “The Academy”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

46: “The Academy” (Season Three, Episode 6)

“Those who enforce the law must obey the law.”

A scene from "The Academy."

Synopsis:

Ahsoka is assigned to teach a class at a leadership academy on Mandalore. Meanwhile, Duchess Satine‘s nephew Korkie and his friends work to uncover a nefarious plot that involves Prime Minister Almec.

A scene from "The Academy."

Analysis:

“Lasting change can only come from within,” Ahsoka says. She’s trying to inspire a class of young cadets to stop the cycle of corruption plaguing Mandalore, find the gumption to hold their officials accountable, and strive to be better as they grow into adults.

It’s the same idea that will inspire the galactic rebellion later on, built by people who had hope and tried to do just that — hold their corrupt government accountable.

A scene from "The Academy."

Lasting change comes from within the individuals who refuse to sit by and wait for someone else to try to fix the problems they see.

A scene from "The Academy." A scene from "The Academy."

Lasting change comes from within the society that’s perceptive and wise enough to acknowledge that the deadliest enemies and the most insidious threats are often not faceless strangers but members of the same group working for their own self interests.

And to combat the problem at hand, Ahsoka must use everything in her arsenal besides her lightsaber, which she respectfully handed off to her Master Anakin upon arrival on Mandalore. Lasting change comes from within Ahsoka.

A scene from "The Academy."

A scene from "The Academy."

She may not have her weapon, but she is far from defenseless. She uses her words to incite the young cadets, who take it upon themselves to begin their own investigation into the alleged food shortage that has left people starving. She uses her wits to get to Duchess Satine after she’s been wrongfully imprisoned, the bait in a trap sprung by the corrupt second-in-command Prime Minister Almec. And she uses the Force to ultimately gain the upper hand.

A scene from "The Academy." A scene from "The Academy."

Ahsoka proves that the Force and a few friends are all the allies she needs. She’s no fool, despite what Almec thinks. And when she leaves Mandalore having completed her mission, there is hope that the cadets she taught and the lessons learned will ultimately allow the neutral planet to break the cycle of corruption.

A scene from "The Academy."

But as inspiring as that is, none of this is easy to come by. In a world fraught with dishonesty, misplaced trust can lead to an agonizing defeat.

Intel:

  • During Ahsoka’s lecture, the graph behind her represents a sharp increase in corruption-related crimes on Mandalore.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when visions of Aurra Sing plague Ahsoka in “Assassin.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

Site tags: #StarWarsBlog

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Rebels in “The Academy”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Children of “Corruption”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

45: “Corruption” (Season Three, Episode 5)

“The challenge of hope is to overcome corruption.”

A scene from "Corruption."

Synopsis:

Padmé, on a diplomatic mission to Mandalore, partners with Duchess Satine to investigate something sinister — Moogan smugglers have been sneaking in supplies, including tainted bottles of tea destined for the Mandalorian schools.

A scene from "Corruption."

Analysis:

There are many ways to poison a community.

A scene from "Corruption."

Misinformation and greed contaminates the moral fiber of neutral Mandalore, in part caused by desperation as trade routes are stifled and the people must turn to black market smugglers for supplies.

Those smugglers are in it for themselves, diluting their product with poison to double their profits. Then they pay off the low-ranking officials who are in place to protect the citizens, but willing to turn a blind eye to make a quick credit.

A scene from "Corruption."

And it’s the children who suffer the most and have the least amount of say in the matter. In their schools, they drink their tea blissfully unaware of any problem, guzzling a poison that sends hundreds to the hospital in an outbreak.

And what’s it all for? So a few people in positions of power could slyly stuff their pockets at the expense of the lives of innocent?

A scene from "Corruption." A scene from "Corruption."

Padmé remains hopeful that with the culprits identified and the tea eliminated, Mandalore will be safe once again. But even the optimistic Duchess Satine has her doubts. If people are willing to let their own children die, her people are in grave danger of losing the very future they’re fighting for.

And this is only the beginning.

A scene from "Corruption."

Intel:

  • Mandalore isn’t just known for an affinity for cubist art — even some of the foods are cube shaped.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when Ahsoka goes undercover on Mandalore in “The Academy.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

Site tags: #StarWarsBlog

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Children of “Corruption”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: The Path to Forgiveness After a “Lethal Trackdown”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

44: “Lethal Trackdown” (Season Two, Episode 22)

“Revenge is a confession of pain.”

A scene from "Lethal Trackdown."

Synopsis:

Jedi Master Plo Koon and Ahsoka Tano set out to capture bounty hunters Boba Fett and Aurra Sing after two attempts to kill Mace Windu. A visit to the Coruscant underworld leads them to Florrum and a dramatic showdown.

Analysis:

What does it mean to have honor among the lawless?

To some, Boba Fett is seeking revenge, but in his mind it’s justice. A life for a life to settle the score of an emotionally injured orphan.

A scene from "Lethal Trackdown."

A scene from "Lethal Trackdown."
A scene from "Lethal Trackdown."

But he’s still just a boy and he’s confused. The young vigilante has been struggling to come to terms with this outlaw life, chafing at executing the hostages to force Mace to come to him. He’s been manipulated by Aurra Sing, a parental replacement for his fallen father, his guide to the life of bounty hunting, protector, and partner until she’s not — abandoning him to his fate and leaving him bitter.

A scene from "Lethal Trackdown."

Aurra, it seems, is in it only for herself.

A scene from "Lethal Trackdown."

But Hondo Ohnaka believes in some sort of code, as does Mace Windu, and while they may not agree to the same morality, they both try to teach the young boy what it means to be honorable.

A scene from "Lethal Trackdown." A scene from "Lethal Trackdown."

“I see now I’ve done terrible things,” Boba ultimately concedes. “But you started it when you murdered my father. I’ll never forgive you.”

And Mace, the patient master he is, is there to provide the most important piece of guidance a young boy could need in this situation. He doesn’t give in to Boba’s hate, and he doesn’t try to make the boy see things from his point of view. He sees Boba for what he is — a child, lost and angry. And like a parent laying down the law, he simply leaves Boba with just one option. “You’re going to have to.”

No malice. No fear or aggression. A simple truth that in order to move forward after even the most staggering loss, the most grievous injury, the first step must be to forgive.

Intel:

  • Look closely and you’ll see that Hondo has been stocking his compound with Republic gunship wings and other recognizable military detritus.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when Padmé and the Duchess Satine team up in “Corruption.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

Site tags: #StarWarsBlog

The Clone Wars Rewatch: The Path to Forgiveness After a “Lethal Trackdown”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: “R2 Come Home”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

43: “R2 Come Home” (Season Two, Episode 21)

“Adversity is a friendship’s truest test.”

A scene from "R2 Come Home."

Synopsis:

Boba Fett and his band of bounty hunters lead Anakin and Mace into a deadly trap on Vanqor. It’s up to R2-D2 to journey back to Coruscant and warn Ahsoka and Plo Koon of their peril.

A scene from "R2 Come Home."

Analysis:

It’s a trap! (I never get tired of saying that.)

A scene from "R2 Come Home." A scene from "R2 Come Home."

A bomb hidden in Jango Fett’s Mandalorian helmet is supposed to finish what Boba Fett started and kill Mace Windu. Instead, it gravely injures both Windu and Anakin Skywalker, leaving them trapped in the debris with the remains of the ship crumbling around them.

A scene from "R2 Come Home."

Their only hope is the brave little astromech R2-D2, a courageous droid who has been by Anakin’s side for years. Battling gundarks and dodging the bounty hunters who mistakenly believe his high-flying moves are Windu at the helm, Artoo not only escapes with Anakin’s desperate message, he makes it all the way to Coruscant to deliver it to Ahsoka and Jedi Master Plo Koon.

A scene from "R2 Come Home."

All the while, Anakin’s faith in his friend never waivers despite Mace’s doubts. Anakin trusts Artoo quite literally with his life, and why shouldn’t he? Artoo has proven before to be so much more than a standard droid co-pilot.

Faithful and bold, opinionated and fierce, R2-D2 is more than just a droid. He’s an essential part of Anakin’s family, arguably this particular man’s best friend.

Intel:

  • The Aurebesh seen on the saddle of the bounty hunters’ speeder bikes translates to say, “Let’s go already.”

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when Ahsoka and Plo Koon catch up to the bounty hunters in “Lethal Trackdown.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

Site tags: #StarWarsBlog

The Clone Wars Rewatch: “R2 Come Home”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Boba Fett Sets a “Death Trap”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

42: “Death Trap” (Season Two, Episode 20)

“Who my father was matters less than my memory of him.”

A scene from "Death Trap."

Synopsis:

Determined to kill Jedi Master Mace Windu, young Boba Fett poses as a clone cadet and sneaks aboard a Jedi cruiser to plant a bomb in Windu’s quarters, but the plan goes awry.

Analysis:

You almost feel bad for Boba Fett here. A clone but not a clone trooper, son of Jango Fett but not really a son in the traditional sense.

A scene from "Death Trap." A scene from "Death Trap."

Orphaned and alone, he’s being raised up by the ruthless bounty hunter Aurra Sing to be little more than a killer without a conscience.

A scene from "Death Trap."

Posing as a common cadet to get his revenge on Mace Windu, the Jedi who murdered his father on Geonosis, as Lucky, he blends right in aboard the Jedi cruiser with the exception of his exceptional shooting skills.

A scene from "Death Trap."

A scene from "Death Trap."

Lucky looks harmless enough to invite pity from the clone troopers who lead him directly to Windu’s quarters and effectively (although inadvertently) help to lay the trap that kills one of their own.

A scene from "Death Trap."

But his anger leads to hate, and his hate leads to suffering — for Windu, for the soldiers aboard the Endurance, for the cadets who he and Aurra Sing left for dead, and for himself.

Traitor.

Intel:

  • When the Endurance suffers a hull breach, one of the troopers caught in the blast lets out a “Wilhelm scream,” a sound effect that dates back to the 1930s and has been used in every Star Wars film.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Come back next Thursday when R2-D2 saves the day in “R2 Come Home.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Boba Fett Sets a “Death Trap”

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Framing the “Duchess of Mandalore”

StarWars.com

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and the all-new episodes coming thanks to #CloneWarsSaved, we’re undertaking a full chronological rewatch of the five original seasons, The Lost Missions, and the theatrical release. We’d be honored if you would join us and share your thoughts on the award-winning series.

41: “Duchess of Mandalore” (Season Two, Episode 14)

“In war, truth is the first casualty.”

A scene from "Duchess of Mandalore."

Synopsis:

On Coruscant, word reaches Duchess Satine that Death Watch is mobilizing, sparking a Republic invasion. On the run from Republic authorities, Satine turns to her old friend Obi-Wan Kenobi for help.

A scene from "Duchess of Mandalore."

Analysis:

In a war embroiling the galaxy, Duchess Satine just wants her planet to be left alone. But those who would seek a tactical advantage by involving Mandalore in the conflict are not so content to allow it.

Seemingly betrayed by her allies, overruled by the Galactic Senate supplying a Republic occupation and an intervention that threatens her stance as a neutral system, Satine is the victim of a corrupt government.

A scene from "Duchess of Mandalore." A scene from "Duchess of Mandalore."

“Counting on the Republic is a mistake,” she says. From her place outside of the growing turmoil, she can see the first suggestion of the changes to come more clearly than those inside the conflict.

A scene from "Duchess of Mandalore."

Her character called into question, and finding herself framed for a crime she did not commit, Satine quickly goes from well heeled bureaucrat to fugitive on the run from the law.

A scene from "Duchess of Mandalore."

But her integrity wins out. She still has friends willing to help put the inciting message into clearer and appropriate context. And she has Obi-Wan, her dear friend (and nothing more), who comes to her aid in her darkest hour.

For the third time in this story arc, Satine and Obi-Wan find themselves back-to-back, united against an impending doom.

Although Satine successfully clears her name in the end with some help from Padmé Amidala and others, the threats are far from over. Death Watch remains and the war continues to rage around her neutral homeworld.

A scene from "Duchess of Mandalore."

Intel:

  • The Coruscant plaza in this episode was inspired by a Ralph McQuarrie concept painting.

What did you think of the episode? Tell us in the comments below and share on social with #CloneWarsRewatch!

Next up: Clone Wars Rewatch will be taking a break for Star Wars Celebration Chicago next week! Come back Thursday, April 18, when a young Boba Fett sets out to avenge his father in “Death Trap.”

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

The Clone Wars Rewatch: Framing the “Duchess of Mandalore”