Bringing Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge to Life

StarWars.com

Lucasfilm creative executive Pablo Hidalgo got his first glimpse of Batuu, the planet inside Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, now open at Disneyland® Resort and opening August 29 at Walt Disney World® Resort, through a concept art painting by longtime ILM artist Erik Tiemens. “I remember when it became real,” he says.

Concept art painting by Erik Tiemens.

Concept art painting by Erik Tiemens.

Tiemens had captured the delicate spires of Batuu along with recognizable faces of Star Wars aliens, like a Mon Calamari, and even some droids that hinted at Ralph McQuarrie’s original production paintings. The galaxy had long ago leaped from the page to the screen and now it was being transformed from imagination into something more tangible. Something real.

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge is an immersive new experience where fans can live out their own Star Wars story with a visit to the planet of Batuu on the Outer Rim. Through modern technology, characters only previously known through animation have been brought to life, and a regular mobile smartphone can transform into an in-universe datapad that can be used to hack some droids or consort with known rebel scum. “At the core of what we’re trying to accomplish is this theme that I think permeates all of Star Wars, which is that anyone can rise up and become the hero of the galaxy,” says Scott Trowbridge, portfolio creative executive from Walt Disney Imagineering. “Whether you’re a poor moisture farmer on some remote planet or you’re some scavenger girl living in obscurity…you can rise up to become a hero.”

Concept art for Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge.

Concept art painting by Erik Tiemens.

‘Ground it in reality’

Building Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge was a feat of conceptual continuity and real-world engineering and artistry, a labor of love involving a team that expanded to about 4,000 artisans, engineers, designers, architects, and more working together to bring the land to life. But it all started with an artistic vision grounded in the world we know and Star Wars lore.

Greg Ashton, a concept architect with Walt Disney Imagineering, joined the project in 2014. “The Force Awakens hadn’t come out yet so we had a lot of questions about where the new trilogy was going to be headed and what our take on the Star Wars galaxy was going to be,” he says. “So it was very much a blank sheet of paper….We wanted to come up with something that we hadn’t seen before. We wanted something that was a new location that really told a different story.”

“It was really critical that we ground it in reality,” says Doug Chiang, Lucasfilm’s creative director. “So we did a lot of research….what is it that really informs the viewer that there’s layers and layers of history?”

Concept art for Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge.

Concept art painting by Brett Northcutt and Erik Tiemens.

Changing the scale of petrified Earth forests gave the towering spires a distinctly Star Wars feel without being unbelievably alien. Ironically, landing the life-sized Millennium Falcon — “In all its cinematic glory but in real life,” as Chiang puts it — as the land’s centerpiece was also an important step in ensuring Batuu felt like it existed in the galaxy far, far away. Seeing the ship that made the Kessel Run in less than 12 parsecs, a deeply important character throughout Star Wars, was a bit of childhood fulfilment for Chiang himself. “I could even smell it and it smelled great. Like oil and metal.”

More than just looking the part, designers were adamant that the land had to be a new Star Wars story that would star each visitor at the center of their own journey. “We all know Luke’s story and we know that we’re not in it,” says Trowbridge. “So we wanted to create a set of stories that allow you to become a character in it, not just a passive spectator.”

“It not only had to be a new world but it had to be a world where interesting things happened,” adds Hidalgo. “It couldn’t be so interesting that a visit would be fraught with danger and insurrection and rebellion and battles and all that kind of stuff. It had to be interesting in a sense of visiting an exotic world where you know enough about it, but you don’t know necessarily what’s around the corner.”

Hondo Ohnaka seen inside Millennium Falcon: Smuggler's Run.

Designers took characters and creatures that had only been conceived in animation, like Hondo Ohnaka, and turned them into something more. “We’ve made real someone that’s only existed as artwork,” Hidalgo says, using cutting-edge Audio-Animatronics figure technology to replicate the smooth, life-like movements of the leathery Weequay pirate. “For those of us that live and breathe Star Wars, I think it’s really rewarding that we took that extra step to make Hondo [appear to be] a real person….I never would have expected seeing a living, breathing, furry pettable Loth-cat. And there it is. We have one.”

DJ R-3X inside Oga's Cantina.

It was also important to fold in nods to earlier Disney/Star Wars collaborations, like the first Star Tours piloted by an unlucky droid. Now R-3X is back with a second career as a DJ in Oga’s Cantina. “He was never destined to become the galaxy’s best pilot. He might not ever be destined to be the galaxy’s best anything, but he does his best,” Hidalgo says.

Concept art for Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge.

Concept art painting by Ric Lim.

Art imitates life

A team of artists hand-carved the namesake spires of Black Spire Outpost, evoking a sense of an ancient and enormous petrified forest to truly transport those stepping inside the themed-land, applying layers of paint to complete the aging and forced perspective effects. “We really dig into the subject matter and look for references whether it’s based on a story, a movie, you know, or a real place on Earth,” says Zsolt Hormay, creative executive of rockwork and themed finishes for Walt Disney Imagineering. “We really do a very thorough job to make sure that what we deliver to the guests are as believable and as correct as possible….Our job is to make sure that our guests really feel where they’re supposed to be.” And even once a design is set and construction begins, the process of sculpting the final layer and applying washes of paint is a proving ground for experimentation and study to achieve the right finish. “We’re trying to push the materials to the limit,” Hormay says. “We never really stop searching for new inspiration.”

To create the right surface and texture for an aged patina, painters layered sometimes a dozen different colors to give walls and other surfaces an authentically aged effect. “Instead of painting it one or two colors, sometimes we have 10 or 12 different layers on top of each other just to really feel that aged look, that weathered look,” he says.

“They think so deeply about how those rocks translate not only up close but as they start to recede,” Art Director Kirstin Makela adds. And the land has its own faux flora — a special kind of fake lichen that you can spot in corners and even some recipes. “The citizens of Batuu harvest it to use for dyes,” she says, so the color appears in fabric dyes and some local cuisine. To create the effect, creators researched Earth lichen, “so it feels like it’s aging and it feels like it’s natural but it doesn’t feel necessarily like something you would just see growing in your backyard.”

Exotic Earth

To build a new themed land that captured the feeling of a long-settled planet, the creative team studied real-life cities in Turkey and Morocco to draw inspiration and help them understand how the formerly walled cities would have grown, changed, and aged over the years. “Things in Star Wars tend to be a synthesis,” says Hidalgo. “There’s a lot of real-world inspiration when you look at the Star Wars saga.” But designers also visited the streets of Jedha, taking a trip to Pinewood Studios outside London to get a closer look at the set of Rogue One, an equally important source of inspiration.

Concept art for Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge.

Concept art painting by Ric Lim.

Modern-day locals in real-life markets helped to influence the look of the Black Spire marketplace, while closer looks at the details of erosion on buildings made of stone and mud brick gave the art department a deeper understanding of the ways they might show similar wear and tear, plus burn marks from blaster fire, on Batuu.

“We knew that the architecture of Black Spire and the landscape of Batuu were completely intertwined,” says Ashton. “They developed in parallel and you see that. If you look at some of those old cities, those ancient cities like Istanbul and Marrakesh, they’ve developed over time. They’ve got these amazing markets and districts, but they have a unique sense of where they sit in geography.” A small garden cemetery beneath a gated archway in the middle of the city of Istanbul inspired the look of the outdoor seating area by Docking Bay 7 Food and Cargo. They also found inspiration for the restaurant, the cantina, and other shops and experiences from an oil bath station to Dok-Ondar’s Den of Antiquities from location scouts and existing Star Wars designs and shape language. “They all had to fit into districts that were distinct.”

The team was essentially reverse-engineering the galactic past, inventing an entire planet and ecosystem that could be made from Earth materials but feel authentically like fans had just walked not onto a movie set but into the Star Wars films themselves. “It was organic,” says Ashton. “As an environment designer, our job is to create an environment that tells a story. And all of the details you see need to make sense and tell that story.”

After all, on a film set, it’s all about the visual illusion, but it only has to stand up to suspension of disbelief and the magic of moviemaking, not to a tactile experience and millions of guests. “[On film] we can cheat things by making things out of plywood and foam,” Chiang says. “For a theme park, we can’t. It has to be absolutely real because the guest – when they walk through it they’ll be touching it, they’ll be smelling it, maybe they’ll be tasting food. And so everything about that experience can’t break that illusion. Designing for a theme park requires a higher level of fidelity than anything else I’ve ever experienced.”

A scale production model of Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge.

A scale production model of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge.

Ancient history

The goal was to make sure newcomers felt the weight of Batuu’s history without being told. “The land does tell a story but it isn’t a spoken story,” Ashton says. “It needs to make sense if you’ve been a fan since 1977 or you’ve never experienced Star Wars at all.”

The scope of the project was ambitious. Conceptually, designers were adding a whole new planet to the Star Wars galaxy, from scratch. In reality, construction experts were toiling to erect the paired outposts on two separate plots of 14 acres each. “It’s kind of like building two small cities simultaneously,” Ashton says. “On both coasts.”

“We’re engaging all your senses at once,” Hidalgo says. The soundscape and hints of music had to work together with the special effects and landscape. For the first time ever, fans would be able to smell a Star Wars planet and taste its local cuisine, and every detail large and small — from the seating and interior design of the eateries to the food itself – had to feel authentic.

“Everything in Galaxy’s Edge is meant to be lingered upon,” Hidalgo says, so each detail “has that sense of history and backstory to it.”

Now that guests are taking their first steps into this larger Star Wars world. “I want them to be inspired to really just live their own adventures not only in our land but also in their real lives,” Makela says.

“Some of my favorite things are just the surprises, the little details,” adds Hidalgo. “I’m just a big fan of detail.” Hidalgo fell in love with the Star Wars saga as a kid hitting pause on his Betamax cassette and scouring every scene for hidden details. “We were able to pause, rewind, pause, rewind and soak in every detail on a given frame.

“Now, you are your own pause and rewind. Wherever you turn your head…you can really stop and pick apart every element and detail.”

Whether you’ve already visited or are planning your own adventure in the future, you can learn more about how Walt Disney Imagineering and Lucasfilm brought Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge to life this week on The Star Wars Show!

Additional images by Kyle Kao. Featured concept art by Nick Gindraux, Greg Pro and Erik Tiemens.

Get details to plan your visit and more with StarWars.com’s full coverage here.

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Disneyland® Resort is now open. Reservations and valid theme park admission required to visit the land between May 31 and June 23, 2019. Beginning June 24, No Reservations required. Subject to Capacity.

Guests staying at a Disneyland Resort hotel between May 31 and June 23, 2019 will receive a designated reservation to access Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge during their stay. One reservation per registered Guest. Each Guest is required to have valid theme park admission. If the hotel reservation is cancelled, the Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge reservation will be cancelled. Additional restrictions apply.

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge will open at Disney’s Hollywood Studios in Florida on August 29.

Capacity for Disney’s Hollywood Studios, Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge and its experiences is limited. 

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Want to talk more about The Clone Wars? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you thought about today’s episode.

Site tags: #StarWarsBlog

Bringing Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge to Life

Let’s Take A Second to Admire Sci-Fi User Interfaces

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Computer interfaces in the real world are, generally, frustrating, boring, and at best functional. No one has great joy in using Google Chrome, and everyone is always mad at whatever update Twitter is rolling out. But in sci-fi? In science fiction, user interfaces aren’t just useful. They’re the coolest shit imaginable

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Captain Marvel is Even More Alien in Unused Concept Art

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Captain Marvel has two identities. She’s Carol Danvers, Air Force pilot, human woman of Earth. She’s also a Kree warrior, an elite pilot fighting a galactic war. This concept art emphasizes that second identity—portraying her as something fundamentally more alien than we see in the films.

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Designing Star Wars: Star Wars Resistance

StarWars.com

The look of Star Wars is unlike anything else in popular culture. Step back in time to explore the history and philosophy behind the concepts that define the galaxy far, far away in Designing Star Wars.

In Star Wars, nothing’s ever really gone. More than 40 years after the first film, creators routinely go back to those earliest drawing boards for inspiration. And oftentimes, among the stacks of unused concept art and sketches, they find models and muses for the next generation of Star Wars storytelling.

In creating the new anime-inspired look of Star Wars Resistance, Art Director Amy Beth Christenson turned a forgotten Ewok ancestor into a bird-like business partner, resurrected an impossible droid, and kitbashed pieces of some of the most recognizable ships in the galaxy into something new and unique. “We have a tradition of going back and looking at what didn’t make it,” Christenson says, scouring through the old Ralph McQuarrie, Joe Johnston, and Nilo Rodis-Jamero concepts.

Concept art from Star Wars Resistance

Concept art by Amy Beth Christenson

BB-8 

BB-8 was already a big-screen star when Christenson and her team were designing the look of Resistance. But to translate Poe Dameron’s beloved droid into animation, she consulted early concept art for the roly-poly astromech’s debut in The Force Awakens.

Concept art used to inspire Star Wars Resistance.

Concept art by Christian Alzmann

The idea was to reimagine BB-8 in the anime-inspired style, a slightly rounder, “stylized and squat version of himself.” The redesign was also a conscious effort to differentiate the animated version from his live-action counterpart but retain the spirit of the feisty little droid.

Concept art used to inspire Star Wars Resistance.

Concept art by Christian Alzmann

“There’s a level of simplifying that went with it, as well,” Christenson says. The animated BB-8  has just one antenna and “you don’t see the red light in the lens.” But she was meticulous about maintaining the details on the individual plates around the roundy’s body.

Concept art used to inspire Star Wars Resistance.

Concept art by Jake Lunt Davies, above, created for The Force Awakens, is shown alongside the final concept of BB-8, below, by Amy Beth Christenson for Star Wars Resistance.

Concept art from Star Wars Resistance
Concept art from Star Wars Resistance

“I think the biggest thing was the eye size. The second I started going through the images of the concept art, that was pretty consistent,” Christenson adds. “BB-8 has a pretty small head in proportion to his body but he needs to be up there [on Resistance] acting with all these other animated characters.”

Concept art from Star Wars Resistance

Lighting concept by Molly Denmark

Flix

Although he’s claimed he’s part Gungan, Flix actually shares some lineage with the Ewoks of the forest moon of Endor. Well, sort of.

Before the showrunners met to settle on plot points, Christenson and her team had drafted pages and pages of character designs for background vendors, mechanics, and racing fans. “Flix and Orka just happened to be on a page together, next to each other on a lineup,” Christenson says. “When (Dave) Filoni saw them together he was like, ‘Those are our acquisitions guys. Don’t change anything about it. That’s them.’ Just the contrast between body types of Flix and Orka, worked really well together.”

Concept art used to inspire Star Wars Resistance.

Concept art by Nilo Rodis-Jamero

In designing Flix, Christenson used two pieces of original Ewok concept art to inspire Orka’s long-legged partner. One was little more than a fuzzy scrawl, a rough idea of a lithe alien in goggles next to what would later become the design for the Yuzzum species.

Concept art used to inspire Star Wars Resistance.

Concept art by Ralph McQuarrie

A second discarded Ewok design helped focus the idea, with a beaky nose and beady eyes poking out from fuzzy, feathery tufts of fur. “What if I ended up making this a space chicken?” Christenson thought.

Concept art from Star Wars Resistance

Concept art by J.P. Balmet

“So that’s what I did. There wasn’t really any big ‘A-ha!’ moment. I started drawing it and it sort of came together, the idea of this super simple egg shape with big eyes, a little beak, little antennae, and long legs. Super goofy.”

Concept art from Star Wars Resistance

Hype’s droid

To create ace pilot Hype Fazon’s astromech R4-G77, a technological marvel unlike any other droid seen before it, Christenson took a page from original trilogy designer Joe Johnston’s sketch book.

Concept art used to inspire Star Wars Resistance.
Concept art used to inspire Star Wars Resistance.
Concept art used to inspire Star Wars Resistance.

One of those first concepts even appeared to float.. That design would have added new challenges for the special effects team working on the film, but proved to be just what the Aces required. “It’s pretty different from anything,” Christenson says. “It did sort of take a visual jump. You don’t really see that much in the other astromechs.”

Concept art from Star Wars Resistance

Concept art by Colas Gauthier

In-world, Hype’s prestigious racing record has netted him fame and fortune through numerous sponsors, represented in patches decorating his jumpsuit. It stands to reason that the cocky Rodian would also enjoy other trappings of wealth — including a unique, customized droid. “He’d want to stand out. He’d want to be different,” says Christenson. “So looking at that, it sort of just fit.”

Concept art from Star Wars Resistance

Torra’s racer

To create the fleet of custom racers, Christenson took part in a hallowed Star Wars tradition — ship-building through kitbashing.

Concept art used to inspire Star Wars Resistance.

Concept art by Ralph McQuarrie

Concept art used to inspire Star Wars Resistance.

Concept art by Ralph McQuarrie

Concept art used to inspire Star Wars Resistance.
Concept art used to inspire Star Wars Resistance.

While the original ship builders and model makers took model rockets and motorcycle kits off the shelves and reimagined the parts as the starfighters and speeders we know today, Christenson looked to those final designs and earlier concept sketches to salvage her own array of parts and pieces for a never-before-seen look.

“Torra’s born with a lot of money and you can kind of tell,” Christenson says. “For her, everything would have been custom built.”

Concept art from Star Wars Resistance

Lighting concept by Molly Denmark

Concept Art from Star Wars Resistance

Concept art by Amy Beth Christenson

The A-wing informed the design. but the smooth curves and general shape also took into account the character. The precocious young racer would need a custom ride built for speed, so it had to be aerodynamic. It also had to match her individual style. “It sounds kind of silly but her bubbly personality, literally, we tried to get that into everything. Even her droid is a lot more rounded.”

“We always try to design the ship to the personality for the racers,” Christenson adds. For Hype’s green Ace, Christenson started the design with an X-wing cockpit, “although by the time we got to the final Hype cockpit we would have remodeled it.”

Concept art from Star Wars Resistance
Concept art from Star Wars Resistance

For Griff, the character’s background as a former Imperial TIE fighter pilot informed the design. “Maybe back in the day if he’d been some sort of tester for new TIEs, they were always kind of redesigning the TIE,” Christenson surmised. Maybe this was the new next generation of that TIE,” at least at the base level.

Concept art from Star Wars Resistance

Lighting concept by Molly Denmark

Rucklin’s speederbike

When it came to a new speederbike design, Christenson used a similar thought process.

Concept art used to inspire Star Wars Resistance.

Concept art by Nilo Rodis-Jamero

She revived an old design by Nilo Rodis-Jamero from the archives.  The short answer behind what drew her to the sketch: “Awesome design, wanted to use it somewhere,” she says with a smile.

Concept art from Star Wars Resistance
Concept art from Star Wars Resistance

It was also a logical offshoot of the speederbikes the Empire used in Return of the Jedi. “They’re pretty lightweight looking. They’re pretty thin. They break apart easily,” Christenson says. This more substantial design felt like it could withstand the momentum and sudden drops the episode called for. “You haven’t seen anything that beefy before. It felt like you had something that had a lot of engine to it to be able to handle that drop.”

Lighting concept by Molly Denmark

Buggles
For Torra’s beloved pet, Buggles, Christenson consulted The Wildlife of Star Wars.

Concept art used to inspire Star Wars Resistance.

Sketch by Terryl Whitlatch

The book of galactic flora and fauna includes this sketch by Terryl Whitlatch of a tiny Voorpak family. “The biggest that Terryl drew it was actually dwarf-rabbit sized,” Christenson says, or “teacup-poodle sized.”

In Resistance, the Ace pilot’s pet needed to be more dog-like, so Christenson scaled it up, but the basic premise was largely perfect. “That design was fantastic because it was like half dog, half cat, half rabbit, half spider,” Christenson says.

She also reduced its spindly legs from eight to just six, “kind of just to help save the animators’ sanity, honestly,” she says. “It was twofold: animator sanity and it was too busy to look at. Having those eight legs, especially with Buggles being bigger, you didn’t know what leg was supposed to be what.”

Featured concept art by Christian Alzmann.

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you love most about Star Wars!

Designing Star Wars: Star Wars Resistance

This Star Wars Battlefront II Concept Art Is Almost as Pretty as the Game Itself

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By design, concept art is usually inferior to the final product. That first step is just an idea, even if it’s a very well-developed one; the other is what that idea is working toward, the end result. And yet, sometimes the two things get closer than you’d expect, which is the case with Star Wars Battlefront II.

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Designing Star Wars: Cyborgs, Twisted and Evil

StarWars.com

The look of Star Wars is unlike anything else in popular culture. Step back in time to explore the history and philosophy behind the concepts that define the galaxy far, far away in Designing Star Wars.

In a galaxy embroiled in conflict, where wars rage between peaceful ideals and a lust for power, the internal struggle of mechanically-altered men is a microcosm of the battles surrounding them, the clash between darkness and light.

Concept art of Darth Vader.

Concept art by Warren Fu

Flesh-and-blood intermingles with machine to allow these badly injured warriors to fight another day, yet irrevocably alters the core of their characters. In prolonging basic life-support, the organic creature deep within the metal exoskeleton becomes barely recognizable, assisting autonomic function in a body that is too far gone to exist otherwise.

Beginning with the mysterious helmeted figure of Darth Vader, himself more machine than man, and continuing to the more recent resurrection of Maul, no longer a Sith yet building a new life through the aid of myriad metalized parts, cyborgs have struggled to maintain their identity, while reflecting the greater hostilities surrounding them. Each one forces us to consider – when the natural world is fused with unnatural elements, how much of the character’s essence truly remains?

Concept art of Darth Vader.

Concept art by Luke Fisher

Darth Vader

For the man who was Anakin Skywalker, mechanical implants are simply a means to extend a life devoted to revenge and fueled by fear. Darth Vader rises, twisted by the Emperor’s machinations, the good in him all-but consumed by darkness, a sinister figure whose presence is punctuated by the shuttering gasps of his breathing apparatus.

But in peeling back the layers to expose the man beneath the mask, artists and designers who have shepherded Vader through his prequel transformation and to the quieter, vulnerable moments in a bacta bath on Mustafar, have uncovered more of the conflict within.

Concept art of Darth Vader.

Concept art by the JAK Films Art Department

Although his seething rage and fear of loss was already putting Anakin firmly on the path to be the Emperor’s apprentice, losing his right arm to Dooku only to have it replaced by a fine mechanical mechanism marks the beginning of his physical transformation into what he would become. Later, viciously cut down by Obi-Wan Kenobi and burned beyond recognition, his Jedi robes fused to shreds of charred flesh, what remained of his humanity, and the man who was Luke Skywalker’s father, was essentially snuffed out.

Concept art of Darth Vader.

Concept sketch by Norman Reynolds

Concept art of Darth Vader.

Concept art by Luke Fisher

No longer being torn apart by the competing forces of darkness and light, the last pieces of Anakin’s former self went dormant, the last bit of good in him hidden, his organic systems still functional but the soul of Anakin atrophied and nearly obliterated by the Emperor’s lies.

Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker on the gantry in the reactor shaft in the Cloud City of Bespin.

Concept art by Ralph McQuarrie

Under Palpatine’s watchful gaze, Darth Vader was built from the ashes of his former life,  restored in a fashion, but warped beyond all recognition, stumbling off the operating table a monster of his master’s creation. Only his son, seeing beyond this horrifying façade, could save him and put his tormented soul to rest.

Concept art of Luke Skywalker's bionic hand.

Concept art by Norman Reynolds

The balance

Luke’s own bionic limb arguably deepened his compassion for the vestiges of his father left behind Darth Vader’s mask. His hand severed in combat during their duel on Cloud City, Vader attempted the same kind of manipulation that had worked on Anakin all those years ago. “Come with me,” he says. “It is the only way.” But Luke sees another solution, preferring to let go and free falling into the unknown.

Princess Leia and the injured Luke Skywalker with a medical droid and C-3PO aboard the Medical Frigate.

Concept art by Ralph McQuarrie

Concept art from The Empire Strikes Back.

Concept sketch by Ralph McQuarrie

Luke’s connection to his sister, Leia, proved to be stronger than any mind trick or devious ploy, and safely aboard the medical frigate, like his father before him, he was fitted with a mechanical limb.

Concept art by Christian Alzmann

Concept art by Christian Alzmann

Yet, unlike Vader, Luke never lost sight of his humanity or his identity. His new hand served as a reminder of his own mortality, and allowed him to empathize with Darth Vader after his green-bladed lightsaber left his father’s own hand a smoking stump of exposed wiring. Luke delivered the blow (and several more) in defense of his sister, enraged by Vader’s threat to try to turn her, but confronted with his father’s vulnerability, he realized not only that he’d moved beyond defense to blind, spitting rage, but that he and his father were not so different. A hand for a hand had settled the score. If he continued and murdered his father, he would be no better than the monster he once believed Vader to be.

Concept art of Maul

Concept art by Luke Fisher

Maul

For Maul, a body fused with mechanical pieces salvaged from a garbage heap may have fueled his madness, but was not to blame for his journey down the path to the dark side. When Obi-Wan cut down Darth Maul, cleaving the agile Sith Lord in two and seemingly destroying the Zabrak warrior, he was left for dead by his master Darth Sidious.


Concept art of Maul
Concept art of Maul

His shattered body delivered to the junk planet of Lotho Minor to waste away, Maul lost his mind, cobbling together a hideous set of spindly spider-like legs to scuttle among the refuse until he was rescued by his brother, Savage Opress.

Two claw-like appendages eventually restored Maul to a closer approximation of his original silhouette, and his powers grew, disassociated from the Sith and seeking his own stake in the seedy world of crime bosses and criminals. As Maul’s legs were refashioned and upgraded, he never lost sight of his quest for vengeance.

Concept art of Maul

Concept art by Jake Lunt Davies

Given Maul’s upbringing and training with the Sith, it’s difficult to know how much the loss of half his physical form impacted whatever compassion he may have been capable of, exhibited only in glimpses through his relationship to the brother who came to his rescue when all others had abandoned him. Groomed to be a calculating and cunning warrior, he already exhibited a cold android-like demeanor long before gaining his metal limbs.

Concept art of General Grievous

Concept art by Warren Fu

General Grievous

Then there’s the gruesome droid-general with haunting alien eyes, General Grievous, a monstrous fusion of metal and organic material that makes it impossible to disassociate the two. Circuitry was grafted directly to brain tissue, red Kaleesh flesh peeking out from behind his helmet and armor protecting the vital organs that co-mingled with his cybernetic implants.

Concept art of General Grievous

Concept reference by Aaron McBride

His organic systems essentially scooped out and contained in a battle-ready droid body, Grievous retained but a fraction of his former self, revealed by little more than watery yellow pupils shielded by a fearsome mask and a hacking cough that betrayed his biology.

Sequestered in his lair on the third moon of Vassek, a labyrinth of chambers that suggested a connection to an alien warrior and a macabre fixation on collecting trophies from the Jedi he killed in battle, Grievous maintained some control of his modifications, keeping his own droid doctor and spare parts on hand for painful but necessary upgrades and repairs.

Concept art of General Grievous

Concept art by Aaron McBride

But with a well-placed blaster bolt, igniting whatever parts of his original form still remained – referred to in concept art reference materials as “Grievous’ gutsack” and inspired by real-world biological components and textures as well as the viscous nature of dish soap — Grievous was damaged beyond repair.

Concept art of Lobot.

Concept sketch by Ralph McQuarrie

Lobot

Among these characters fusing mechanical capabilities with the limitations of their natural qualities, there is perhaps no sadder tale than Lobot. Lando’s loyal aide made a tragic sacrifice, voluntarily giving up his humanity for the greater good and allowing himself to become a blank organic host to a computerized brain.

The cyborg construct so prominent on his head was leftover from Imperial employment, a fusion to increase productivity and give him a droid-like ability to run battle calculations and communicate with computer systems.

For a time, Lobot retained his identity, but ultimately surrendered his humanity during a failed theft aboard Emperor Palpatine’s personal yacht — tapping into the network to unlock the escape pods so he and Lando would have a chance at survival. Lobot gave himself over to becoming an emotionless body controlled by the machine and continued to serve by Lando’s side, using his last moments in control of his mind to send a message to his friend that he believed that the scoundrel was capable of more.

Featured concept art by Christian Alzmann.

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you love most about Star Wars!

Designing Star Wars: Cyborgs, Twisted and Evil

Designing Star Wars: Monstrous Beasts

StarWars.com

The look of Star Wars is unlike anything else in popular culture. Step back in time to explore the history and philosophy behind the concepts that define the galaxy far, far away in Designing Star Wars.

To quote Jar Jar Binks, there are “monstairs out dare!”

From the murky depths of the waters of Naboo to the maelstrom surrounding Kessel, the darkest corners of the Star Wars galaxy are filled with nightmarish and misunderstood (and quite often hungry) creatures. The artistic concepts and practical designs for such beasts are the first steps in the journey to creating monsters that elicit a visceral reaction, the realization of our most terrifying childhood fears come to life with snapping jaws and scraping claws. They also have their own stories beyond their roles as menace and indiscriminate maw. Some are imprisoned but treasured (and even mourned) while others are simply ravenous or defending their home turf from raiders and pirates. Still, even when you sympathize with a beast, it’s unwise to get too close to its gnashing teeth.

Concept art of the opee sea killer and other creatures.

Sketch by Terryl Whitlatch

Opee sea killer – The Phantom Menace

The first thing you might notice about the opee sea killer is its gaping mouth, especially if you’re seated in a Gungan submarine getting reeled in by the monster’s gooey tongue, a design choice that conceptualized the luminous creature of the deep as little more than an enormous jaw grafted onto a hybrid fish-crab body. Real marine life, like the deep sea anglerfish, also helped inspire the menacing and hungry sea monster, which latches onto the Gungan vessel carrying Obi-Wan Kenobi, Qui-Gon Jinn, and Jar Jar Binks with a flick of its long and incredibly sticky tongue.

Concept art of the opee sea killer.

Above: Concept art by Doug Chiang Below: Anatomical sketches by Terryl Whitlatch

Concept art of the opee sea killer.

Although quickly proven to be far from the most deadly thing lurking in the waters of Naboo — “There’s always a bigger fish,” as Qui-Gon says when the sando aqua monster swoops in to make a quick and easy snack of the comparatively tiny menace — the opee sea killer came the closest to living up to its name and devouring the Jedi and their Gungan friend before they could reach the surface of Theed’s Solleu River.

Concept art of the summa-verminoth.

Concept art by James Clyne

Summa-verminoth – Solo: A Star Wars Story

Dwelling in the murky maelstrom surrounding the planet of Kessel, the summa-verminoth was first envisioned as a monstrous jellyfish swimming among the stars with the Millennium Falcon plotting a course straight through its head. The idea “came from throwing dumb ideas out in a meeting,” James Clyne, Lucasfilm’s design supervisor on the film, said in The Art of Solo: A Star Wars Story. “I literally opened my sketchbook and pitched, ‘What if the Falcon had to fly through a jellyfish?’” he said with a laugh.  But director Ron Howard liked the idea so much that Clyne and his crew of artists set to work sketching what would become the creature’s enormous eyeballs. “Again, that was just me doing a drawing and being like ‘What if we did a big eyeball, guys?’ It was kind of terrifying,” Clyne previously told StarWars.com.

Concept art of the summa-verminoth.

Concept art by Aaron McBride

The gleaming blue eyes and innumerable tentacles soon included a toothy mouth, the better to chomp on recently jettisoned escape pods. But that lust for shiny ship debris would prove to be the creature’s undoing — venturing too near the gravity well stripped away its flesh before it was lost to the merciless pull. Emitting a mournful cry, it’s hard not to feel sympathetic for the creature. Under different circumstances, the summa-verminoth could be just another gentle giant floating through space trying to survive.

Concept art of the wampa.

Storyboard art by George Hull

Wampa – The Empire Strikes Back

The bright, snow-covered terrain of Hoth can be blinding, and that’s perfect camouflage for a hungry wampa in search of a meal. In creating the towering, horn-headed carnivore, designers went through no less than three incarnations to perfect the snarling visage of the wild beast. First designed in 2-D by Joe Johnston (and later reimagined for the Special Edition by George Hull), puppet master Stuart Freeborn built a full-sized suit from sheep and goat skins complete with stilted boots to turn 7-foot-4 actor Des Webb into the 11-foot-tall space yeti. But the suit was too cumbersome even for the wampa’s lumbering steps, and after meandering just a few feet, Webb would often face-plant in the snow, according to The Moviemaking Magic of Star Wars: Creatures and Aliens.

Concept art of the wampa.

Above and below: Special Edition storyboard art by George Hull

Concept art of the wampa.

A redesign of the creature’s head and eyes made the wampa appear a little too cuddly for George Lucas’s tastes, so Phil Tippett created another more ferocious incarnation. For the Special Editions nearly 20 years later, designers took yet another crack at the mysterious creature who would feast upon the smelly carcass of a tauntaun and drag an injured Luke back to its lair to leave him dangling for later.

Concept art of the rancor.

Concept art by Ralph McQuarrie

Rancor – Return of the Jedi

Caged in a hidden pit below Jabba the Hutt’s throne room and tended to by a kindly keeper, the rancor was a misunderstood beast, a victim of circumstance whose hunched, spiny posture and sharp claws created a most fearsome first impression. With threads of spittle dripping from its bone-crunching jaws and two dull, beady eyes, the rancor would attack anything that came within its grasp, stopping only when it was caught by the same sharp metal gate that had kept it from being free.

Concept art of the rancor.

Concept art by Jackson Sze

Rancors were later revisited in The Clone Wars, native to Felucia and still just as imposing in the wild as the poor, fanged beast Luke encountered on Tatooine. In tracing the design back to its origins, we discover that the idea for the rancor was deceptively simple. According to designer Phil Tippett, “George [Lucas’s] original instructions for the rancor were, ‘Do whatever you want, but I want a big monster in a pit.’”

Concept art of the rancor.

Above: Concept art by Nilo Rodis-Jamero Below: Concept art by Joe Johnston

Concept art of the rancor.
Concept art of the rancor.
Concept art of the rancor.
Concept art of the rancor.

The creature went through several incarnations — a more docile beast with a potato-like body, a lumpy head with spidery mandibles, and even one version that was deemed “too Muppet-like,” according to hand-scrawled notes. Eventually, artists settled on long, sinewy arms, clawed hands, and an enormous head, dominated by a wailing mouth to complete the imposing monster’s look.

Executing the idea was another problem, as the design was conceived to costume a performer but the dimensions didn’t fit a human. The final costume was an elaborate mix of puppet effects and suiting that took three people to operate but was still limited in terms of movement, and eventually replaced by a pint-sized (yet still incredibly ferocious) puppet for the final shot. Special effects master Dennis Muren filmed the 18-inch puppet at a faster-than-normal speed to give the creature the weight and grandeur of a 16-foot-tall behemoth, a vision of terror that has endured for generations.

Concept art of the fyrnocks.

Lighting concept by Chris Voy

Fyrnock – Star Wars Rebels

Lurking in the darkness of the abandoned rebel base at Fort Anaxes, a fortress built on an asteroid, the fyrnocks made their home in the shadows leaving behind little more than telltale gashes from their sharp claws. The sun seemed to be their only weakness, sending them scurrying away from the light, their glowing yellow eyes peering out from the dark. Although a menacing sight emerging from the base ready to attack or prowling around with clicking claws and fangs, the creatures could be tamed through the Force, or at least summoned to formulate a more strategic attack on foes.

Concept art of the fyrnocks.

Above and below: Lighting concepts by Chris Voy

Concept art of the fyrnocks.
Concept art of the fyrnocks.
Concept art of the fyrnocks.
Concept art of the fyrnocks.
Concept art of the fyrnocks.
Concept art of the fyrnocks.

In lighting concept art, the fyrnocks take on something even more akin to a horror-film quality. Their skin smokes and sizzles in the sunlight and their teeth end in more vampiric points, like rows of long needles. It’s enough to make anyone fear the dark.

Featured concept art by Doug Chiang.

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver what you love most about Star Wars!

Designing Star Wars: Monstrous Beasts