Make Your Star Wars Collection Look Most Impressive with This DIY Display Stand

StarWars.com

If your Star Wars action figures are outgrowing your shelf space, or you’re the type who just likes to be a little more organized, you can make your own custom display stand in almost no time at all! Spray paint and decals can turn a boring, tiered wooden spice shelf into a scene straight out of Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back.

This action figure display stand is inspired by the duel on the steps of Bespin’s carbon-freezing chamber. (We won’t judge you if you decide to use it just to re-enact the iconic lightsaber battle between Luke Skywalker and Darth Vader.)

What You’ll Need

  • Wooden spice shelf (3-tier)
  • Black spray paint
  • Black acrylic paint
  • Red adhesive vinyl sheet
  • 5/8” circle paper hole punch
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Pencil
  • Paint brush

Get Started!

Step 1: Begin by spray painting the wooden shelves black. More than one coat may be needed. If it’s an extendable rack, be sure to gently pull the shelves out as far as you can for best coverage.

Let the paint dry completely.

Step 2: Use the 5/8-inch paper hole punch to cut one circle from the red vinyl sheet. Cut around the hole in the sheet of vinyl to save the circle as a template.

Step 3: Using the grid on the back of the vinyl sheet as a guide, trace one circle, and then trace another circle about 1-inch to 1.25 inches next to it.

Star Wars DIY display stand - cutting out paper lights

Step 4: Draw two lines connecting the top and bottom of the circles, using the ruler to keep them straight. Cut out the rounded oval shape. Don’t peel the backing just yet — this one will be your template for the other ovals you’ll be cutting out!

Step 5: Cut out six holes in the red vinyl with the 5/8-inch hole punch. Remove the backing and stick the circles to both ends of the “stairs” on all three tiers.

Step 6: Trace the template several times and cut out multiple ovals. For the shelves in this how-to, we used nine ovals total. Punch additional red circles as well.

Step 7: Arrange the ovals and circles on the bottom step to get the spacing just right and to create a pattern of circle-oval-circle. Once you’re confident in the spacing you’d like, begin removing the backing and sticking the red shapes on front side of the stairs.

Star Wars DIY display stand - applying red stickers as lights

Note: You’ll have to remove and re-stick the red shapes if you notice the spacing isn’t working or the shape is crooked. Keep the black acrylic paint on hand for any touch-ups if the black spray paint comes off with the adhesive.

Step 8: Continue cutting and sticking shapes until the pattern is complete. If you have a larger collection, don’t forget to extend the shelving on an expandable rack to continue the pattern.

Kenner figures on a DIY action figure display stand

Your display stand is finished. Arrange your favorite toys on the shelf or tabletop to show off just how impressive it is—and then share it with Star Wars on social media so we can ooh and ahh!

Kelly Knox is a freelance writer who loves creating Star Wars crafts with her daughter. Follow her on Twitter at @kelly_knox.

Make Your Star Wars Collection Look Most Impressive with This DIY Display Stand

Tell Mom ‘Yoda Best!’ with This DIY Star Wars Trinket Dish

StarWars.com

Making Mom a handmade, one-of-a-kind gift for Mother’s Day is practically a rite of passage. So why not make her something that she’ll love as a Star Wars fan, and also honors a Jedi Master who’s a one-of-a-kind himself? Use a Yoda cookie cutter or pancake mold with air dry clay and paint to craft a trinket dish that stands out from all the roses.

Don’t have a Yoda cookie cutter? Any Star Wars character cutter or mold will do, especially if it’s the favorite character of the mother figure in your life.

What You’ll Need

  • Air-dry clay
  • Clay roller
  • Star Wars Yoda cookie cutter or pancake mold
  • Light green acrylic paint
  • Gold acrylic paint
  • Clear acrylic spray
  • Sandpaper or emery board nail file
  • Clean, empty cup or small bowl
  • Water
  • Paint brush

Get Started!

Yoda tray craft - scuplting

Step 1: Begin by kneading the air-dry clay to soften it. (You can also add a small amount of water.) Roll it out on the table with the clay roller until it’s no thicker than a centimeter.

Yoda tray craft - using the mold

Step 2: Press the pancake mold or cookie cutter into the clay firmly around the edges. Remove the excess clay.

Step 3: If you’d like to remove any facial features, wipe them away with a dab of water on your finger until the face is smooth.

Yoda tray craft - mold complete

Step 4: Gently peel the shape from the table. Place it in the empty cup or small bowl so that it begins to take a curved shape; don’t let it fall in or get wedged. Shape the clay around the edges until it is rounded.

Step 5: Remove the clay from the cup or bowl and place it concave side down on the table to dry. Let dry 24 hours.

Step 6: Using fine sandpaper or an emery board nail file, softly smooth the edges of the clay. Take care to remove any rough lumps or cracks on the edges.

Yoda tray craft - painting

Step 7: Place a small amount of water in your light green acrylic paint; this will lessen or remove the appearance of brush strokes on the clay, but will require more than one coat. Paint the entire dish green except for the edges.

Yoda tray craft - painting complete

Step 8: Use the gold acrylic paint to paint the edges all around the dish.

Step 9: Let all acrylic paint dry completely. Once the green and gold paint is dry, take the dish to a well-ventilated area and spray it with a clear acrylic varnish or sealant. Let dry completely. Flip the dish over and spray the other side, and let dry.

Yoda tray craft - complete with trinkets

Your Yoda trinket dish is complete! Don’t worry if it’s wobbly. A handmade gift doesn’t have to be perfect — moms will find messy paint, fingerprints in the clay, and cracks just as endearing as the gift itself. Trust us. We are wise in the ways of the moms.

Kelly Knox is a Seattle-based freelance writer who loves creating Star Wars crafts with her daughter. Follow her on Twitter at @kelly_knox.

Tell Mom ‘Yoda Best!’ with This DIY Star Wars Trinket Dish

Most Impressive Fans: Meet the Champions of Star Wars Cosplay from Celebration Chicago

StarWars.com

On the day before Star Wars Celebration Chicago opened its doors, Lucky McQueede arrived at a hotel parking lot with a pile of scrap materials, five gallons of yellow paint, and just 12 hours to pull together a towering loader droid cosplay.

As it turns out, the garbage would do.

Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.

McQueede, who makes a living as a stuntman, puppeteer, and creature effects artist in Los Angeles, cobbled together a massive cosplay for the official Cosplay Competition and walked away on stilted legs with the Best in Show title.

Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.

Based on HURID-327, the massive red loader droid glimpsed at Maz Kanata’s castle in Star Wars: The Force Awakens, McQueede’s MC-219, nicknamed MAC the Loth-CAT, was actually his back-up for the contest. He intended to bring his Darth Maul cyborg cosplay, another behemoth on special digileg stilts, that he built seven years ago. But the costume needed some repairs and his makeup artist, who completes the upper half of the cosplay, got sick. So he went to plan B.

“I found all the parts for this on and off in the garbage for the last three weeks,” McQueede said, perched on a trash can and resting inside the venue shortly after winning the contest April 13. McQueede used discarded Nerf gun parts, stilts he already owned, and other pieces of mesh and metallic debris for the build. “When it comes down to it, it’s about shapes.”

Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.

McQueede couldn’t get started on the work of putting it together until he got to the convention. As part of a cargo transport for 501st members from California, Utah, and Colorado, on April 6 he hit the road, driving from Los Angeles to Chicago over several days and making stops to pick up astromechs from friends in the R2 Builders Club. During a stop in Colorado, McQueede’s father gave him the bucket of safety paint, the same hue used to mark off parking spots, and he pulled into the Windy City on the evening of April 10.

The next day, while the convention kicked off, McQueede was sitting in the parking lot of a Hilton Garden Inn waiting for cosplayers to pick up their gear and constructing his loader droid. “I had to babysit the truck so I built a robot,” he joked. He still had paint encrusting his fingernails when he won Saturday afternoon.

When he was done, MAC stood 10 feet tall, although he has a two-and-a-half foot reach with the pair of monstrous and agile arms on either side of the droid’s body. As the convention was winding down Monday, he could still be seen strutting the exhibition hall floor giving high fives. His training in Hollywood over the last 20 years certainly helped him accomplish the task in the strict 12-hour timeframe, he says, and he had some help from Katy Coleman, the creature performer who was inside the original droid suit on the set of Episode VII. That helped him figure out how to slip the body of the droid onto a backpack for support and ease of movement. “That was the key.”

Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.

The royal treatment for Princess Leia

Although McQueede took home the top prize, he was just one of many impressive cosplayers on stage during the Star Wars Celebration Cosplay Contest and among fans wandering the exhibition floor all week.

Autumn Ziegler put almost 300 hours into her Elizabethan Leia ensemble, which clinched Best Mash-Up at the contest, and took a half hour just to put on. Ziegler had the idea when she was attending a previous Celebration, but didn’t get started sewing until January. To get the intricate costume done in time, Ziegler said she put in “a lot of weekends, a lot of late nights,” starting this January.

It was her first time crafting an Elizabethan gown, so she had to do hours of research and joined some period costuming groups on Facebook for tips. “It was a lot of bum rolls and farthingales,” she said. “There’s actually a lot under here just to give it the right shape.”

Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.
Detail from an Elizabethan Leia costume in the Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.
Detail from an Elizabethan Leia costume in the Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.
Detail from an Elizabethan Leia costume in the Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.

She added in subtle nods to Star Wars in the details. The sleeves are inspired by Leia’s ceremonial gown, with ties that are printed with tiny silver X-wings. The rebel starbird is woven throughout. “I’ve always loved the Tudor time period and Princess Leia is my favorite character so I wanted to give her the royal treatment. Had she visited the court of Queen Elizabeth a long time ago…what would the dress consist of?”

Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.

Jango Fett, Samurai warrior

Frank Wehrkamp, who won for Best Armor, styled his Jango Fett cosplay off the Samurai-inspired Bandai collectible figure. When he was deployed in Afghanistan last year, he used his downtime to begin programming the build and then 3-D printed 60 percent of the cosplay this fall, “as soon as I got home,” he said.

He had previously crafted a stormtrooper in the same style, but Jango Fett has always been his favorite character, he said. The costume creation required “a lot of resin, a lot of paint, a lot of blood, sweat, and tears.” But when it was done, his helmet didn’t fit into any of his luggage.

Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.

“Funny story,” he said. On the plane ride to Chicago, “I carried it in my lap.” But for takeoff and landing, he couldn’t keep it there “and I couldn’t stick it under the seat, so I had to wear it in flight all the way here from Las Vegas.” That’s dedication.

“Just to pull off a win was amazing,” he added. The night before the competition, he and his family had to run out and buy sandpaper to mend some parts that broke in transit. “I mean, I brought an emergency kit, but no sandpaper,” he said. “Next time.”

And not only did he get the judges’ vote, several fans at the Bandai booth were smitten with his life-size interpretation of the collectible, he said. “The attention we got was just insane.”

Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.

Stitching fit for a queen (or a senator)

Jennifer Catania got her start in theatrical and period costuming, so the historical influences of the prequel trilogy came through in her interpretation of Padmé Amidala’s dinner gown from the lake retreat. The painstakingly detailed creation won for Best Stitching.

Catania had already been on an elegant dress kick when she discovered the lace for the skirt in a shop, which inspired her to the begin the project. “The rule with Star Wars costuming is that if you see fabric that is anywhere close to screen accurate, you have to buy twice as much as you think you’ll need,” she said.

Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.

The gown — with a skirt sewn specifically so she can wear flats underneath to keep her comfortable and get her closer to Natalie Portman’s actual height in the scene — could almost be worn to a black-tie gala in this galaxy.

Catania put almost 120 hours of stitching into the look, with about half of that dedicated to hand beading the black velvet choker and the long beaded fringe at the front. Some of the beads were actually leftover plastic bits from a stormtrooper costume she had built, she noted.

For the cape, she used 13 yards of feather trim laid out in 10 distinct rows. The black pleather corset beneath was modified from a late 1800s corset pattern she custom drafted a few years prior.

“I think the best part of the contest was getting to hang out with all those amazing costumers,” she said afterward. Catania, a teacher by day, loves to cite sources and problem solve her different cosplay creations and share them with the community of builders and crafters. “That’s the reason I entered in the first place,” she said. And she was not disappointed, getting the chance to talk shop with cosplayers she follows on Instagram or had previously interacted with online.

Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.
Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.
Champions of Cosplay from Star Wars Celebration Chicago.

And these were just a few of the most impressive cosplay creations spotted at Star Wars Celebration Chicago. If we didn’t get a chance to feature yours here, it wasn’t that we weren’t impressed. There simply wasn’t enough time to catch up with all the amazing cosplayers on the show floor and parading through panels!

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Do you know a fan who’s most impressive? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver all about them.

Site tags: #StarWarsBlog, #StarWarsCelebrationChicago2019

Most Impressive Fans: Meet the Champions of Star Wars Cosplay from Celebration Chicago

Bring Imperial Style Home With This DIY Death Star Panel Light Switch Plate

StarWars.com

Luke Skywalker and Han Solo make quick work of the door panels and cameras in Detention Block AA-23 during the heart-pounding rescue of Princess Leia in Star Wars: A New Hope. You can copy the Death Star’s striking style in your own home by adding a panel on the wall that looks just like the ones they blast. Instead of opening a cell door, however, this one will switch on your lights!

Death Star blast door control panel.

What You’ll Need

  • Large light switch plastic plate (2-gang, 1-blank)
  • Red spray paint
  • Red acrylic paint
  • Silver spray paint
  • 2 large and 1 small rubber cone washers (used in plumbing)
  • 3 thin metal ring washers
  • Green and red glitter glue
  • Thin black duct tape
  • Silver duct tape (or any shiny silver tape)
  • Clear glue
  • Craft knife / scissors
  • Ruler
  • Pencil
  • Air-dry clay (optional)

Get Started!

Step 1: Begin by using the air-dry clay to fill the two holes on the blank side of the plate, if desired. Spray paint the light switch plate red. Set aside and let dry completely.

Step 2: Next, spray paint the rubber cone washers and metal washers silver, and let dry completely.

Death Star light switch craft.

Step 3: Cut a strip of the black duct tape about 9 cm. long, or the length of the light switch plate you’re using. Gently stick it to the table you’re working on. Trace the large rubber cone washer along the side of the tape, and cut out the half-circle. Peel the tape from the table and stick it to the red plate next to the opening for the light switch.

Step 4: Cut another 9 cm. piece of black duct tape and lightly stick it to the table. Place the smaller rubber cone washer on the tape and mark the top and bottom. Cut the tape into two pieces, leaving a gap where you marked it.

Step 5: Trace the larger cone washer on the bottom piece of tape and cut out a half circle. Line it up with the other half circle you cut previously in the first piece of tape, and stick this tape alongside it.

Tip: Peeling and re-sticking the black tape can remove the spray paint from the plastic! If you’re having trouble lining up the pieces, don’t press too hard on the black tape until you have it where you want it. If you do accidentally pull paint from the plate, you can use red acrylic paint to touch it up.

Death Star light switch craft.

Step 6: Next, cut three thin strips of silver tape the length of the plate. If you’re having trouble making straight cuts, stick the silver tape on a cutting mat and run the craft knife along a ruler.

Death Star light switch craft.

Step 7: Place two silver strips along the left and top edges. Place the remaining strip on the right of the light switch, closer to the switch than to the edge.

Step 8: Use the clear glue to glue the cone washers and metal washers to the light switch plate between the black and silver tape on the left side.

Step 9: While the glue is drying, paint the screws that came with the light switch plate red. Let dry.

Death Star light switch craft.

Step 10: Fill the inside of the bottom two ring washers with green glitter glue, and the top one with the red glitter glue. Let dry completely.

Death Star light switch craft complete.

Once all glue and paint are dry, your Death Star light switch is operational!

Kelly Knox is a freelance writer who loves creating Star Wars crafts with her daughter. Follow her on Twitter at @kelly_knox.

Bring Imperial Style Home With This DIY Death Star Panel Light Switch Plate

That’s No Moon, It’s a DIY Death Star Valentine

StarWars.com

You might not think about love when you gaze upon the Death Star (unless, perhaps, you’re Director Orson Krennic), but your valentine will know you care when you hand them this handmade card. This simple pop-up card can be assembled quickly, no doubling of efforts required!

What You’ll Need

  • Textured silver scrapbook paper
  • Black, red, orange, and yellow card stock or scrapbook paper
  • 65 cm heart paper punch
  • Small heart paper punch
  • Black permanent marker
  • White acrylic paint
  • Clear glue
  • Scissors
  • Paintbrush
  • Pencil
  • Black pen

Get Started!

A Death Star Valentine's Day craft is made.

Step 1 : Begin by folding the silver scrapbook paper in half, with the white side out. Trace or draw a large circle on the paper, about four and half inches in diameter, with the top part of the circle on the fold. This will be the inside of the card. Cut out the circle, which should make an hourglass shape when unfolded.

Step 2 : Use the folded circle as a template and trace the shape on the remaining silver paper. Cut it out. This will be the front of the card.

Step 3 : Cut a heart from the same silver paper with the heart paper punch.

A Death Star Valentine's Day craft is made.

Step 4 : Cut a notch, about one inch in length, in the fold at the top of the card. Press it forward and unfold.

A Death Star Valentine's Day craft is made.

Step 5 : Open the card. Gently push the notch inside and press the card closed, so that it forms a stair shape when the card is opened.

Step 6 : Cut a heart from the red paper with the heart hole punch.

A Death Star Valentine's Day craft is made.

Step 7 : Lightly trace the opened inside of the card on the yellow paper to use as a size guide. Draw a burst shape on the yellow paper inside the traced circle and cut it out.

Step 8 : Again, use the yellow burst as a template, lightly trace it on the orange card stock for sizing. Draw a smaller burst inside the traced burst and cut it out.

A Death Star Valentine's Day craft is made.

Step 9 : Glue the smaller orange burst on the yellow one, and the red heart on top of the orange burst. Let dry.

Step 10 : Fold the burst in half. Glue it to the front of the stair shape and on the bottom half of the card. Close the card and trim any parts of the burst that may be sticking out of the sides. Let the glue dry completely.

Tip: Close the card and place books or other weights on top of it to help it dry flat.

A Death Star Valentine's Day craft is made.

Step 11 : While the glue is drying, begin making the front of the card by using the black permanent marker to draw the trench across the center.

Step 12 : Next, glue the silver heart you cut previously just off-center and close to the trench.

Step 13 : Dip the unbristled end of the paint brush in the white paint and start adding the lights on the Death Star. Add as many as you’d like, grouped together in rows.

A Death Star Valentine's Day craft is made.

Step 14 : Use the small heart hole punch to cut a tiny black heart, and glue it to the center of the silver heart. Let the paint and glue dry completely.

Step 15 : Once dry, glue the painted front of the card on to the front of the folded card. Let dry completely.

Finally, open the card to make sure the pop-up works correctly and add a personal message.  Our suggestion: “You can’t repel love of this magnitude!”

For more DIY Star Wars Valentine’s Day crafts and ready-made cards, check out Cricut for creative patterns, CSS die-cut card packs, a Hallmark mailbox and card kit perfect for the classroom exchange, and other ready-made cards from American Greetings and Lovepop

Kelly Knox is a freelance writer who loves creating Star Wars crafts with her daughter. Follow her on Twitter at @kelly_knox.

That’s No Moon, It’s a DIY Death Star Valentine

Give Your Holiday Guests the Warm Fuzzies With a DIY Chewbacca Wreath

StarWars.com

Chewbacca is taking time away from the family this Life Day to stay at your home for the holidays! This furry Chewbacca-themed wreath will make your guests feel right at home from the moment they spot it on your front door. Add the ornament or a Wookiee action figure to clue in guests who might not easily recognize Star Wars characters, or leave it with just Chewie’s bandolier.

Either way, every time you come home and open the front door, you won’t be able to resist saying, “Chewie, we’re home.”

What You’ll Need

  • Foam wreath
  • Brown craft fur
  • Wide gold holiday ribbon
  • Brown holiday ribbon (not as wide as the gold ribbon)
  • Large white jingle bells
  • Chewbacca ornament or toy (optional)
  • Scissors
  • Hot glue gun
  • Flexible measuring tape

Get Started!

Chewbacca wreath craft - scissors and tubing.

Step 1: Begin by wrapping the measuring tape around the wreath to measure its circumference.

Chewbacca wreath craft - cutting fur.

Step 2: Cut pieces of the brown craft fur as wide as the circumference you measured so that each piece fits neatly around the wreath. Shorter pieces are easier to glue on the wreath, so don’t cut the fur longer than four inches or so.

Chewbacca wreath craft - wrapping fur around tube.

Step 3: Once you have cut several pieces of craft fur, begin wrapping them around the wreath and hot gluing them to the foam.

Note: Make sure each piece of fur is adhered in the same direction and slightly overlap for a smoother look. Also, place the lengthwise “seam” of the fur pieces all on the same side of the wreath for the same reason.

Step 4: Continue gluing the fur until the entire wreath is covered. If you missed any small areas, cut and glue small pieces of fur to fill it in.

Step 5: Wrap the wide gold ribbon once around the wreath on the top right, and glue the ends down on the same side as the fur seams.

Step 6: Wrap the brown ribbon once around the gold ribbon and glue it down.

Chewbacca wreath craft - attaching bells.

Step 7: Hot glue the large white jingle bells to the brown and gold ribbon, evenly spaced, to finish the bandolier.

Step 8: Cut a long piece of gold ribbon and a shorter piece of brown ribbon. Fold the gold ribbon into a loop, and then wrap the brown ribbon around it to make a bow. Glue the ends down and adjust the gold ribbon until you have a neat bow. Glue it to the bottom of the bandolier.

Step 9: Hot glue a Chewbacca ornament or toy to the wreath if you want to make sure everyone knows who your favorite Wookiee is. (The hot glue will likely damage an action figure, so choose carefully!)

Chewbacca wreath craft finished!

Your Chewbacca wreath is complete! Ho-ho-hhhaaargghhh!

Kelly Knox is a freelance writer who loves creating Star Wars crafts with her daughter. Follow her on Twitter at @kelly_knox.

Give Your Holiday Guests the Warm Fuzzies With a DIY Chewbacca Wreath

Craft a Nice, Juicy Gorg-ament for Your Holiday Tree

StarWars.com

Gorgs are delicious treats both on Star Wars Resistance’s Colossus station and in real life. But did you know they also make a perfect holiday decoration? Papier-mâché, wooden beads, clay, paint, and a splash of glitter combine to add a little personality to your holiday decorations, kids’ playrooms, or refueling station.

Kaz is shown in a scene from Star Wars Resistance.

What You’ll Need

  • Round papier-mâché ornament
  • Two large wooden beads
  • Air-dry clay
  • Model Magic clay
  • Cream, grey, turquoise, pale green, and black acrylic paint
  • Craft knife
  • Hot glue gun
  • Paint brushes
  • Glitter

Get Started!

Step 1: Begin by hot gluing the two wooden beads on top of the ornament on either side of the hanging string, opening side down. Let cool.

Step 2: Fill in the openings on the top of the beads with the air-dry clay and let dry.

Step 3: Next, use the air-dry clay to fill in around the sides of the bead, making the eyes look attached to the gorg’s body (the ornament).

Step 4: Shape eyelids for the gorg with the air-dry clay, and gently press the clay to the top of the wooden bead. Blend as needed and let all clay dry completely, preferably overnight.

Steps to make a glitter gorg ornament.

Step 5: Paint the belly of the gorg with the cream-colored acrylic paint. Paint the body and the eyelids with the grey paint and let all paint dry.

Step 6: Paint the gorg’s eyes turquoise and let dry before adding the pupils with the black paint. If you’re having trouble with the small dots in the pupils, dip the other end of the paint brush in the black paint and gently dot it on the wooden bead.

Step 7: Add two black dots on the front of the ornament for the gorg’s nose. Let all paint dry completely.

Steps to make a glitter gorg ornament.

Step 8: Use the Model Magic clay to make three small fin shapes. One will be the larger fin on top of the gorg’s head, and the other two will be smaller fins for the back of the ornament. Let the clay dry overnight.

Steps to make a glitter gorg ornament.

Step 9: Paint the fins a pale green and let dry.

Step 10: Hot glue the larger fin to the top of the ornament, and the two smaller fins on the back side.

Steps to make a glitter gorg ornament.

Step 11: Use silver or holographic glitter glue over the dry grey paint and let the glitter dry completely. Repeat on the belly with a white glitter, and let dry.

Your gorg ornament (or, if you prefer, gorg-ament) is complete! Make it together with your kids to celebrate Star Wars Resistance and the holidays this winter.

Steps to make a glitter gorg ornament.

Kelly Knox is a freelance writer who loves creating Star Wars crafts with her daughter. Follow her on Twitter at @kelly_knox.

Craft a Nice, Juicy Gorg-ament for Your Holiday Tree

Star Wars Pet Makeovers Transforms a Pooch into Jabba’s Pal

StarWars.com

I never imagined I would give my dog a makeover. But when Oh My Disney! contacted me to see if I wanted to give my pet, Chuy, a Star Wars makeover, how could I resist? I immediately said yes, while my dog celebrated his good fortune with a nap on the couch. Chuy is my 12-year-old Chihuahua, and he’s gotten used to being dressed up in my handmade creations. Over the years, I’ve dressed him up as Ebenezer Scrooge, a Star Destroyer, and most recently, a porg! One character I’ve always wanted to dress Chuy as is Salacious B. Crumb. Not only is Salacious one of my favorite Star Wars creatures, but Kowakian monkey-lizards and Chihuahuas do look similar.

When I arrived on set for Star Wars Pet Makeovers by Oh My Disney, Chuy and I didn’t know what to expect. We got whisked away into hair and makeup (for me) and then we met with costume designer, Ngozika Okeke to discuss outfit options. I got a little distracted by all the incredible-looking Star Wars masks and helmets. [Insert Tusken Raider battle cry here.] Thankfully, Ngozika helped me get back on track when she shared some of her ideas for Chuy’s makeover. I also showed her the Boushh-bounding outfit I had put together for the photo shoot. After we added a makeshift bandolier to my ensemble, it was time for Chuy’s big moment.

Jennifer Landa poses with her dog, Chuy, who is dressed as Salacious B. Crumb.

Chuy’s Salacious B. Crumb makeover was perfect. Ngozika made his costume from feathers, which meant the pieces were extremely lightweight and easy for my little guy to wear. My Return of the Jedi dreams were realized when I saw the dog-sized Throne Room, complete with a small Jabba the Hutt! I was floored by how screen-accurate the set looked and how it was tailor-made for Chuy. Bounty hunters aren’t supposed to smile but I couldn’t stop beaming during the photo shoot. The photo shoot was a mixture of fun and hilarity, but it also ended up being a special day for both of us, I think. As I mentioned earlier, Chuy is a senior dog. He’s got a lot of energy left but he’s definitely in his twilight years. And after my daughter was born, he moved to a lower rank in the pack. So the makeover ended up being a chance to spend some quality time with my little buddy — hanging out, laughing, eating treats — just like Jabba and Salacious B. Crumb.

If you’re interested in dressing up your furry friend, here are my 5 pet costuming tips!

Jennifer Landa poses with her dog, Chuy, who is dressed as Salacious B. Crumb.

1. Know your dog. The most important thing when picking out your pet’s costume is to know what they will feel comfortable in. Some dogs don’t like having their legs or paws covered. Other dogs are happy to sit in an Ewok hood and body suit all day. If this is your pet’s first time dressing up, try something easy-to-wear like Yoda ears or a BB-8 hoodie. This will give you a better sense of what their comfort level is…and whether they’re ready to rock that Han Solo wig and vest.

2. Choose fabrics wisely. Once you know your dog’s comfort level, it’s time to think about fabric options. Soft fabrics like fleece or fake fur are always a safe bet. Synthetic fabric like polyester is often used to make pet cape costumes, like Darth Vader, or dresses, like Princess Leia’s in A New Hope. I have learned that my dog prefers fleece and fake fur fabric over polyester costumes. It all depends on your pet’s personality. If you have your heart set on that Lando Calrissian dog costume, try it on your pet. But if they give you a look that seems to say “This deal is getting worse all the time,” it might be time to ditch the cape.

3. DIY or store bought? There are so many choices when it comes to Star Wars costumes for pets. You can find lots of affordable options online and in pet stores. The great thing about buying a pet costume from a store is that it comes in multiple sizes to ensure the best fit for your pet. If you’re looking for a Star Wars pet costume that is outside of the box, like a Star Destroyer or TIE Fighter, DIY’ing it will be your best bet. Just make sure that whatever costume you choose, your pet can move freely and breathe easily.

4. Limit the amount of time in costume. Your pet may not mind wearing that cardboard Boba Fett jetpack at first, but after 5 minutes, your pup may show you that they’ve had enough. No matter how cute your pooch looks in their getup, it’s only fun if they’re comfortable, too. If they have trouble walking, if they keep scratching themselves, or try to bite the costume, that’s your cue to step in. Even cozy costumes made of fleece can become uncomfortable over time so always keep an eye on your pet.

Jennifer Landa poses with her dog, Chuy, who is dressed as Salacious B. Crumb.
Jennifer Landa poses with her dog, Chuy, who is dressed as Salacious B. Crumb.
Jennifer Landa poses with her dog, Chuy, who is dressed as Salacious B. Crumb.

5. Be a dynamic duo. Couples costumes aren’t just for humans, so why not match your pet? Dress up as Luke Skywalker on Dagobah to match your dog’s Yoda costume. Be the AT-AT driver to your dog the AT-AT. Even if your pet is wearing a simple Star Wars costume, like a set of Leia buns, it will all make sense when you show up in a Chewbacca fur suit.

Giving your pet a Star Wars makeover can be a fun experience for you and your furry companion. Just remember that when you get them into character, always listen to your co-pilot’s grunts, growls, and barks.

Catch up on all the episodes of Star Wars Pet Makeovers on Oh My Disney’s YouTube channel.

Jennifer Landa is an actress, host, and crafter. Follow her on Twitter @JenniferLanda and for more Star Wars DIYs, visit her YouTube channel.

Star Wars Pet Makeovers Transforms a Pooch into Jabba’s Pal

Keep It Clean This Halloween With This Star Wars Resistance Pumpkin

StarWars.com

The Colossus platform in Star Wars Resistance may be filled with hotshot pilots and brilliant mechanics, but there’s one crew member who goes largely unnoticed and unappreciated — until now!

Opeepit, the humble Frigosian maintenance worker, is definitely keeping an eye on Kaz. And if you need someone to keep a watchful eye on unruly trick-or-treaters, you can make a pumpkin that looks just like the hardworking hero to make sure things don’t get too out of hand this Halloween.

What You’ll Need

  • Printed Frigosian pumpkin template
  • Medium orange craft pumpkin
  • Black glitter craft foam (adhesive backing)
  • Plain black craft foam
  • Black tape
  • Purple plastic Easter eggs
  • Gray acrylic paint
  • Black permanent marker
  • Battery-powered LED light
  • Pumpkin carving knife
  • Clear glue
  • Scissors
  • Craft knife
  • Pencil
  • Chalk
  • Paint brush

Get Started!

Step 1: Paint the stem of the craft pumpkin with the acrylic gray paint. Let dry completely.

Step 2: Separate the top and bottoms of the Easter eggs and discard the tops. Trace the bottom of one egg with the chalk on the middle of the pumpkin, making two circles for Opeepit’s eyes about two inches apart. Cut out the circles, and one small circle in the bottom of the pumpkin (for adding and removing the LED light) with the pumpkin carving knife.

A Resistance pumpkin craft, step 1.

Step 3: Print and cut out the shapes on the provided template. Trace the L and R eyes, and the larger shape below them, on the backing of the black glitter craft foam. Cut out the shapes.

Step 4: Cut three strips of the plain black craft foam, about a quarter of an inch wide and one inch long. Glue them in the middle of the nose glitter foam shape and let dry.

A Resistance pumpkin craft, step 2.

Step 5: Next, use the craft knife to cut small openings in the middle of the L and R eye craft foam shapes. Make sure the cut-out shapes are small enough to be hidden by the Easter eggs.

Step 6: Cut several pieces of black tape. Place two between the eyes, and then make a “strap” for Opeepit’s goggles going all the way around the pumpkin. (Smaller pieces of tape are easier to work with, but one long piece will also do the job.)

A Resistance pumpkin craft, step 3.

Step 7: Glue the Easter eggs to the L and R eye shapes and let dry completely.

Step 8: Trace and cut out the two buckle shapes on the plain craft foam. Use the craft knife to cut two small rectangles out of each.

A Resistance pumpkin craft, step 4.

Step 9: It’s time to assemble Opeepit! Remove the adhesive backing from the foam pieces and stick the eyes and nose to the pumpkin, completely covering the two circles you cut in the pumpkin previously. Glue the two buckle pieces on either side of the eyes. Let the glue dry.

A Resistance pumpkin craft, step 5.

Step 10: Finally, use the black permanent marker to draw fur shapes all around the pumpkin. (Did you know Frigosians are actually quite fuzzy?) Your Star Wars Resistance pumpkin is complete.

Slide the LED light into the pumpkin and in the dark the goggles will glower at anyone who dares make a mess!

Kelly Knox is a freelance writer who loves creating Star Wars crafts with her daughter. Follow her on Twitter at @kelly_knox.

Keep It Clean This Halloween With This Star Wars Resistance Pumpkin