Out of Print Launches a New Star Wars Clothing Line with Retro Flair – Exclusive Reveal

StarWars.com

Inside the ancient tree on Ahch-To, Luke Skywalker protected a rare and powerful treasure – the ancient Jedi scriptures, relics of a forgotten time when wisdom was committed to printed paper.

In our own galaxy, even before Star Wars: A New Hope hit theaters, readers were discovering the adventures of Luke and the Rebel Alliance in a novelization based on the soon-to-be-released motion picture.

A new line from Out of Print Clothing showcases retro posters from the American Library Association.

Soon, a new line from the “all things bookish” brand Out of Print Clothing will resurrect these iconic first-edition covers in time for May the Fourth, with an exclusive line of T-shirts for adults and children created in homage to posters from the American Library Association available now.

StarWars.com recently caught up with Todd Lawton, who co-founded the company with his childhood friend, Jeff LeBlanc (who, we must note, once told his mother he wanted to be R2-D2 when he grew up,) to talk about how Star Wars films and books both made him a fan, and why he wants to inspire readers during National Library Week and all year long.

Growing up Star Wars

For Lawton, his earliest movie-going memory was crawling in the back of his parents’ Toyota station wagon to see the original Star Wars at a drive-in. “My parents thought that I would just go to sleep, but it was Star Wars.” The film so captured his imagination that Lawton kept peeking out until he was finally “invited up to the front seat for a better view.”

At home, Star Wars books kept the story going. Before he could read, Lawton remembers owning Star Wars pop-up books. “I was flipping through these books and R2-D2 and C-3PO would pop out. You’d pull a tab and a sand person would do something. I definitely experienced Star Wars through books that way.”

There were books with records complete with voices and sound effects and a larger picture book when Star Wars: Return of the Jedi came around that had pictures of scenes from the movies. “So Star Wars, for me, was definitely cinematic but also a very tactile experience and books delivered that. The toys delivered it. It was a pretty big part of my upbringing.”

A vintage Read poster featuring Yoda.

Poster perfect

If you were a kid around the era of the original trilogy, you may remember back in 1983, when a poster showing Yoda holding a red book in one arm was part of a library series intended to get children interested in literature with the help of pop culture characters and contemporary celebrities.

Star Wars is a vehicle to help support and excite young readers,” Lawton says. “That’s perfectly in line with our mission and we feel that the world’s a better place if people are reading more books. So when you see a character like Yoda or Darth Vader presented in a way that’s supporting this love of reading and the importance of reading, we want to show that and celebrate that as well.”

A new line from Out of Print Clothing showcases retro posters from the American Library Association.
A new line from Out of Print Clothing showcases retro posters from the American Library Association.
A new line from Out of Print Clothing showcases retro posters from the American Library Association.

For the new line, Lawton and his team resurrected the original artwork of Yoda and Darth Vader from actual posters that plastered library walls. They’ve also created an all-new image in the same style — featuring Princess Leia.

“We love how the library has been able to use these pop culture icons to get kids excited,” Lawton says, and he hopes taking the art off the wall and emblazoning it onto shirts will start a lot of conversations about Star Wars and books.

An Out of Print designer also reimagined the line for a new line of stylized socks, which will be released later this year. “Readers love socks,” Lawton says. “Something that if your pant leg is creeping up, it’s a great opportunity to shout how cool you are.”

First editions

Long before the original “Read” line, in the days leading up to the release of the first film, readers were able to get a sneak peek at the epic story on the pages of a then Ballantine (now Del Rey) book.

Kicking off a long and wonderful tradition of exploring and expanding the Star Wars galaxy through books, the novelizations of the original trilogy invited readers to imagine the galaxy for themselves before seeing it on screen.

A new line of Out of Print T-shirts will showcase these original, first-edition covers, down to authentic details like back-cover synopses and the callout “soon to be a major motion picture.”

The shirt for Return of the Jedi matches the paperback Lawton still owns from his youth. “I still have, at my parents’ house, the Return of the Jedi paperback that is the same cover that we’re featuring. I read that one when I got to the point where I could read an adult book. I think that was probably my first real Star Wars novel experience.”

In the years since that first series, “there are so many different novels that have been created that have taken the tremendous story in different directions.”

But readers, and Star Wars fans, never forget taking their first steps into the larger world. “It’s nice to see where Star Wars has grown and how many lives it’s affected, but then also get back to its origin and still discover things that are, for fans or readers, interesting to know.”

And Lawton promises more characters and more product categories to come. After all, when your business partner always had an affinity for heroic astromechs, it only makes sense to try to get them into the line. Plus, there are at least two more Star Wars “Read” posters in the archives, featuring C-3PO and Chewbacca, and an endless supply of other inspiring characters.

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Do you know a fan who’s most impressive? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver all about them.

Out of Print Launches a New Star Wars Clothing Line with Retro Flair – Exclusive Reveal

Her Universe Honors “Sisters of the Force” in New Collection at Star Wars Celebration Chicago – Exclusive

StarWars.com

Nearly a decade ago, when Her Universe was just getting ready to launch its unique Star Wars apparel for female fans, founder Ashley Eckstein was trying on different names that exemplified the brand and the community she was hoping to build.

She landed on “Sisters of the Force,” a phrase that was ultimately left on the cutting room floor. But for Eckstein, the voice of Ahsoka Tano on Star Wars: The Clone Wars and later Star Wars Rebels, it helped to set the tone for things to come. “Sisters of the Force never took off, but it was always kind of my name for the female Star Wars community,” she says. And next week, Her Universe will launch a special “Sisters of the Force” capsule collection at Star Wars Celebration Chicago, with dresses, shirts, hoodies, and even capes that pay homage to some of the bravest women in the galaxy.

“Sisters of the Force, to me, represents women in Star Wars,” Eckstein recently told StarWars.com. “Whether it’s the characters, whether it’s the fans, whether it’s the women who work on Star Wars, there are all of these strong women who bring Star Wars to life. And while my dream with Her Universe, from day one, has been to spread the message that Star Wars is for everyone, I wanted to shine the spotlight on the women of Star Wars with this collection.”

As the company prepares to celebrate its ninth anniversary, Eckstein shares the stories behind the designs in the new line.

An item from the "Sisters of the Force" Her Universe collection.

Padmé nouveau

If this nouveau design looks familiar, that’s because the piece was pulled from the Her Universe vault to be reissued by request. “It was our most popular shirt when we first launched,” Eckstein says. “That shirt hasn’t been available for over 5 years. But people still request it because their first shirt is worn out or they’re a newer Her Universe fan.”

An item from the "Sisters of the Force" Her Universe collection.

Rey tee

Star Wars fandom is like a family, and there’s no place that’s more apparent than at Star Wars Celebration. With the launch of Our Universe last year, Eckstein’s team opened up even more possibilities with unisex offerings. “So many guys not only have supported us from day one but on a regular basis they tell me we’re one of the only brands that offer Ahsoka Tano T-shirts for men,” Eckstein says. When it came time to design a piece for Rey, the team chose a unisex cut and a quote that was indicative of inclusion. “That quote felt like it was right for Rey, right for the saga where we are now going into Episode IX, and just right as an inspiring quote in everyday life.”

An item from the "Sisters of the Force" Her Universe collection.
An item from the "Sisters of the Force" Her Universe collection.

Logo tee

This subtle yet striking black-on-black tee has a secret – on the back is printed an adage from an episode of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, “The Wrong Jedi.”

The quote — “Never give up hope, no matter how dark things seem.” — is one of Eckstein’s personal favorites and a reminder to have faith even in darkness. “To me, Star Wars means hope. That is what it has meant to me personally for years as a Star Wars fan. And Ahsoka is a survivor. Ahsoka lives and Ashoka means hope to me.”

An item from the "Sisters of the Force" Her Universe collection.

Padmé’s lake retreat 

“I’ve been wanting to do Padmé’s lake house dress for years,” says Eckstein. “It’s a very difficult dress to make, and to make a ready-to-wear version that anyone can wear.”

But the flowy chiffon number, with a bustle and delicate finger loops, still felt too fancy for some fans, who asked for an everyday version. That’s when the team designed a hoodie in matching pastel hues. Ultimately, rather than choosing between the two, Eckstein decided to produce both. “Padmé doesn’t get enough love.”

An item from the "Sisters of the Force" Her Universe collection.

Tano sweatshirt

Lucasfilm’s Daniel Kennedy designed this number, a unisex pullover that incorporates Ahsoka’s lekku markings and other identifying features in the design.

An item from the "Sisters of the Force" Her Universe collection.

Ahsoka windbreaker 

Also designed with lekku in mind, the hood on this windbreaker includes two points. “Not only is it a nod to Ahsoka but also kind of a nod to cosplayers,” Eckstein says.

An item from the "Sisters of the Force" Her Universe collection.

Leia’s cape coat

Even though Her Universe doesn’t create screen-accurate replicas, a lot of research went into creating this textured jacquard cape coat with the formidable Leia Organa in mind. “We tried to pick something that closely emulated General Organa’s cape coat,” Eckstein says, then took some liberties adding a rebel symbol to the back and a metal nameplate on the front.

An item from the "Sisters of the Force" Her Universe collection.

Rose Tico army jacket

This rugged jacket takes a lot of cues from Rose’s jumpsuit, and even sports details like a cozy fleece hood and an embroidered patch to match her necklace.

An item from the "Sisters of the Force" Her Universe collection.

Holdo’s dress

“We wanted to do that dress so bad from the second we saw it,” Eckstein says of Admiral Holdo’s draped lavender frock. “But honestly, when we designed our The Last Jedi collection, there was a lot we didn’t know. After the film, when we realized she’s awesome and the dress is awesome, we knew we had to make it!”

A looser fit and shorter cut make this dress more versatile for everyday wear. Plus, it has pockets! “Pockets are the rule, not the exception,” Eckstein says. “We have a general life rule that you should put pockets in as many things as possible. There are some designs where pockets, for the fit, it’s not possible. So that’s the exception. But the rule is if it’s possible to put pockets in a design, there will be.”

An item from the "Sisters of the Force" Her Universe collection.

Sabine pleather moto jacket

Inspired by Sabine’s first-season armor because “for most fans that’s the most recognizable,” Eckstein says, this jacket includes nods to the Mandalorian artist’s handiwork as well as a back panel “inspired by the front of her helmet.”

An item from the "Sisters of the Force" Her Universe collection.

Hera pullover

For this design, Eckstein asked Vanessa Marshall, the voice of Hera, to weigh in, picking her personal favorite quote from the character, “We have hope.”

“If you’re not a fan, I think it just looks like a cool design,” Eckstein says. But if you are, you’ll know you’re wearing a piece that came “straight from the voice of Hera.”

An item from the "Sisters of the Force" Her Universe collection.

Constellation

Even with all these pieces, there were still too many female Star Wars characters to represent them all in the capsule collection. “I called up my friend [and artist] Ashley Taylor and I gave her a list.”

This final design was inspired by a star map and has 27 characters, all celebrated as constellations in a vast expanse of galaxy, and emblazoned on a tee and a pullover.

You can purchase items from the Sisters of the Force collection at Star Wars Celebration Chicago and on HerUniverse.com beginning April 11.

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Do you know a fan who’s most impressive? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver all about them.

Her Universe Honors “Sisters of the Force” in New Collection at Star Wars Celebration Chicago – Exclusive

For Inkkas, the Future of Star Wars is Female — Exclusive Reveal

StarWars.com

The poise of Padmé Amidala, the faith of Leia Organa, and the strength of Rey have been drawn together for a new Inkkas design that celebrates some of the most courageous heroes in the Star Wars saga.

“We want to celebrate the complete saga,” says Tatiana Salaverria, Lucasfilm’s senior designer who worked with the unisex footwear company to create the print, “The Future is Female,” which will appear on two pairs of shoes in their new Rebel Collection.

A lifestyle image of Inkkas Future is Female shoes, part of the Rebel Collection.

What started as a simple sketch of Princess Leia from A New Hope drawn by Christine Lynn Johansen, the lead designer for Inkkas, evolved into a cohesive print, with all paths coming together in an elegant celebration of the original trilogy, the prequels, and the sequels. Each character flows into the next, with Rey’s simple signature arm bands blending into Queen Amidala’s elaborate headdress.

But simplifying these Star Wars icons into a line drawing came with its own challenges. “The most important thing was for us to get their likeness, even though it’s a little bit stylized,” says Salaverria.

Inkkas designer Christine Lynn Johansen shares some sketches from her "Future is Female" print.

Inkkas designer Christine Lynn Johansen shares some sketches from her "Future is Female" print.

With the shoes available for pre-order starting today, StarWars.com goes behind the scenes into the making of a saga-spanning print celebrating three generations of Star Wars women.

Inkkas designer Christine Lynn Johansen shares some sketches from her "Future is Female" print.

The fire of a queen

“Padmé, I think, was the hardest,”says Salaverria. “At first, she was a little too sweet. Padmé, she’s young, but she also has fire behind her.”

“She was looking a bit too young,” agrees Johansen, who tried to concentrate on capturing the emotion of the queen’s face. “It was a challenge going into it. That’s pretty much what we concentrated on getting exactly right. She has that stripe on the lip. We didn’t want it to look too heavy because since it’s all line work we tried to make to look feminine and pretty.”

Inkkas designer Christine Lynn Johansen shares some sketches from her "Future is Female" print.

To me, she’s royalty

For Leia, Johansen’s lines were too thick initially, with the detail on the character’s signature double hair buns giving her hair a little too much weight. “On this print, for sure, less is more,” she says. “It started with too much of a heavy hand. With the eyes, we needed it a little bit more realistic and the lips…we made them a little more subtle.

“We wanted to keep it classic, so with Leia it was a no-brainer to go with her gown,” adds Salaverria.

Inkkas designer Christine Lynn Johansen shares some sketches from her "Future is Female" print.

The next generation

For Rey, Johansen toyed with recreating the outfit that takes the character from the Resistance base to the feet of Luke Skywalker on Ahch-To. “We actually went back and forth quite a bit in terms of what costume to use,” says Salaverria. But ultimately the ensemble the character wore for most of The Force Awakens made the most sense.

The Inkkas' Future is Female camping boot.
The Inkkas' Future is Female slip on.
The Inkkas' Princess Leia Flex Force.

In addition to the “Future is Female” print on a slip on and camping boot style in the line, there’s a Force Flex X sneaker designed in the color palette of Leia Organa. All three shoes include a subtle Rebel Alliance emblem and a quote from Leia, uttered just before she and her would-be rescuers went diving into the Death Star’s garbage chute: “Somebody has to save our skins.”

The Inkkas' Favorite Droids slip on.
The Inkkas' Favorite Droids Flex Force.

The droids you’re looking for…

The line also includes two other pairs of shoes, a slip on and a Flex Force sneaker, that pay homage to two other vital, saga-spanning characters: R2-D2 and C-3PO. After all, if not for the brave little astromech and his fretful counterpart stowing away on an escape pod on the Tantive IV, the Empire’s quest for the stolen Death Star plans may have ended before the first act in A New Hope. The insoles for those designs channel Obi-Wan Kenobi and his trusty Jedi mind trick with the oft-quoted phrase, “These aren’t the droids you’re looking for.”

A Force for good

More than just beautiful pieces of footwear, Inkkas is a force for good, says company co-founder and Director of Sourcing and Distribution David Malino. The company’s OneShoeOneTree project plants a tree for each purchase. “Supporting environmental causes is a big part of our ethos. To date, the Star Wars and Inkkas collaboration has been responsible for planting 5,376 trees as part of Inkkas’ OneShoeOneTree program.”

And with TreesForTheFuture, the brand is helping to fight deforestation in developing nations. “They plant trees mostly in Africa,” he says, “and that’s an important pillar of what we do as a company.”

But the new print also speaks to Inkkas’ dedication to authenticity in original textiles and prints and inclusivity, depicting strong female characters on shoes to be worn by men and women. “As a brand and a company, it’s important for us to support causes and women’s empowerment,” Malino says. “What the company stands for is inclusiveness and this is something that we’re excited to celebrate. We want to make a statement that this is something we’re really excited about. And we want Star Wars fans to be excited with us and celebrate the powerful female characters in all the films.”

The Inkkas' Rebel Collection.

The Rebel Collection is the third collaboration between Inkkas and Star Wars, available for pre-order starting today.

Learn more about the company’s philanthropic initiatives at Inkkas.com.

Associate Editor Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Do you know a fan who’s most impressive? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver all about them.

For Inkkas, the Future of Star Wars is Female — Exclusive Reveal

5 Star Wars Hairstyles We Love

StarWars.com

Whether it’s Leia Organa’s unforgettable hair buns or Padmé Amidala’s decorative headdress, Star Wars is chock-full of iconic looks. While these hairstyles are no doubt unique and head-turning, many of them are also steeped in symbolism or cultural meaning. From Anakin’s over-the-shoulder braid to Rey’s hair knobs, they’re often associated with tradition and history.

Here are five of our favorite hairstyles from the Star Wars films:

Leia at the medal ceremony.

1. The Alderaanian braid

In Claudia Gray’s book Star Wars: Leia, Princess of Alderaan, we learn that the residing Alderaanian monarch typically wears braids. While the book doesn’t dive into anything deeper than this, they seem to be associated with tradition, nobility, and family. And, despite the loss of Alderaan, Leia continues to honor her heritage (especially her adoptive mother) by wearing them.

2. The Padawan braid

The Padawan braid may not be my favorite look (hello there, rat tail), but it holds a deep meaning to the Jedi Order. Traditionally, a training Jedi wears a tight braid that stems from the neck and drapes over one shoulder. But it’s more than just a tangible representation of your rank; it’s a symbol of dedication and sacrifice. In addition to abstaining from romantic relationships, they’re forced to sever ties with their families, as well.

3. Rey’s three hair knobs

Rey’s signature three-knob hairstyle is very practical. Whether she’s scavenging for parts on Jakku, training on Ahch-To, or running away from stormtroopers, she needs to keep her hair out of her face.

While the film doesn’t specifically address the meaning behind her hairstyle, I want to believe it has something to do with her childhood. In The Force Awakens, we see her rocking the same hairstyle as a kid. Is this how she stays connected with her family?

4. Padmé Amidala’s headdresses

Not only is Padmé Amidala the Queen of Naboo, she’s also the queen of elaborate hairstyles and ensembles. Her ornate headdresses are so big, they look like they have their own gravitational pull. And don’t even get me started on the array of colorful dresses. Whether it’s a senate meeting or a fancy dinner, she must have one heck of a bedroom closet.

My favorite look is Padmé’s throne room ensemble. Between the lightbulb-like embellishments on her bell-shaped gown and the gold and red headpiece, this look stands out above the rest. It’s head-turning, for sure, but it also says a lot about her exalted status, as it’s a symbol of power and wealth. She may be a child queen, but this look leaves no doubt that she can command a room.

5. Chewbacca’s glorious mane

This list wouldn’t be complete without an entry dedicated to one character who’s covered in hair: Chewbacca. Long and silky, Chewie’s luxurious brown mane is really the stuff of legends. It’s not a hairstyle, per se, but it’s obvious he takes care of himself (and has even been known to borrow Lando’s hair products in a pinch). If he ever sells haircare routine secrets to the galaxy, he’ll be one rich Wookiee.

 Ashley Barry-Biancuzzo is an editor at Reviewed, a division of USA TODAY. She also occasionally writes for Geek & Sundry and StarWars.com.

5 Star Wars Hairstyles We Love